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I want a free guitar lesson - Adam ... :)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 9:00 pm
by Gordon Moore
Okay, so there I am playing basic blues, E, A, B, (I IV, V )

So, if I'm playing an E chord, I play a solo using E minor blues/pentatonic yeah?

Now when I change to an A, should I play using the A minor blues/pentatonic or stick with the E scale? ditto for B.

And don't say, let your ears guide you, cause mine don't work that quick.

ALSO

when doing delta blues, are the thumb and other fingers truly independent, or is it just a question of learning the song, bit by bit so it seems that the thumb and fingers are independent? If independent any suggestions as to how to develop this skill?

Your A minor blues scale practice was great, though I can't push the strings that much sometimes. I started to think about where on each string the notes were and how to move between them. However, I haven't done anything since - and that is why I'm crpa (sic)

Gordon :-()

PostPosted: Wed Aug 06, 2008 9:27 pm
by Adam Blake
No, don't change key just because you've changed chord. Having said that, major pentatonic sounds nice over the I chord, then changing to minor pentatonic (but staying in the same key) over the IV chord is a good move. But just playing the same lick throughout the whole chorus often works very well too. Just ask Chuck Berry.

Delta Blues is mostly played with the thumb and forefinger.

Hope that helps.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 1:26 am
by Dayna
Lessons would be fun, but I'd have to start over again. i'm too confused.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 07, 2008 6:33 pm
by Gordon Moore
Many thanks maestro - I shall give up work and practice :)

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:54 pm
by Dayna
Is it better to learn on an acoustic guitar or an electric? Or does it matter?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 9:51 pm
by Paul Inglis
Dayna wrote:Is it better to learn on an acoustic guitar or an electric? Or does it matter?


Electrics are generally a bit easier to play than acoustics, due to lower actions and narrower necks.

On the other hand playing on acoustic helps to build finger strength. I like to practise on an acoustic mainly so that when I switch to electric everything feels easier!

The trick is to try to avoid really cheap guitars that might be close to unplayable. There is nothing more off-putting to a beginner than a guitar that is so hard to play that you can barely fret a simple chord and especially if the action (and intonation) are so bad that playing a barre chord throws the guitar out of tune.

Of course, as a beginner you might find it hard to know what a good guitar "feels" like. A (beginner) friend of mine bought an Epiphone acoustic recently and showed it to me while saying "I guess it really isn't much good". I picked it up and played a few things for him - the guitar was really quite nice and easy to play - it was just difficult for him to play, being a novice. Keep at it - it took me about 3 months to get halfway decent, and I was a songwriter/keyboard-player deciding at age 19 that I'd better get competent on guitar! I played every day for 2 or 3 hours (or more somedays). I learned on an absolutely rubbish cheapo guitar, incidentally, so it is possible if you are determined!

The other hard part is tuning. Unless you have perfect pitch you will struggle with this, so make sure you get a tuner to make it easy!

The good part is that you more you practise and the more you listen and live the music, the better you will get!

Of course, Adam might be able to tell you more!

PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 9:57 pm
by Dayna
Thanks for all that information.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 04, 2009 9:33 pm
by Dayna
I've actually learned a couple of simple little songs with E,F,& G, in the book I have now & I'm not feeling so funny about it anymore. I'm having loads of fun with picking up each new thing I learn.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:10 pm
by Dayna
I'm finding playing a guitar isn't so hard, but keeping a rhythm in your head while playing is difficult. I wonder if a metronome, would help like they use for pianos. Is that a good idea or silly?

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 2:12 pm
by Adam Blake
It's a very good idea. I'm glad you're finding it easy. That's great! I hope your fingertips are righteously sore - if they're not, you're not practicing enough!

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 3:34 pm
by Dayna
I know I have a long ways to go. One thing that's been a little difficult is ending one note smoothly before going to another. I love this! It's all just difficult enough to make it a challenge, & that's what makes me so excited when I do get it. Then there's a problem with the guitar sliding down my leg when I'm sitting. It has a strap, but somehow the holes got stretched & the ends keep falling off. The guitar actually almost fell once, when I had the srap on, but thankfully I caught it in time. I asked my Dad what to do about this, & he suggested putting some water on the leather would shrink the holes a little, but I don't think that helped.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 4:53 pm
by Dayna
My fingers have little lines in them now. I was given these six little songs to learn, to help me learn reading notes, & they've all gotten much smoother. I feel so happy....

Re: I want a free guitar lesson - Adam ... :)

PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:09 pm
by Paul Inglis
Gordon Moore wrote:Okay, so there I am playing basic blues, E, A, B, (I IV, V )

So, if I'm playing an E chord, I play a solo using E minor blues/pentatonic yeah?


The reason why you might want to do this is because the essence of blues is not so much the I IV, V chord progression (or the 12 bar structure) but rather the flattened (or "blue") 3rd and 7th notes played against a major chord. You'll find these notes by using the minor pentatonic scale instead of the equivalent major scale. Some blues songs even employ the flattened 5th note (The Beatles' "I Want You" is a good example).

Of course, it's not just a question of playing the notes always flattened - you can experiment with bending the notes back up toward their "normal" major scale non-flattened equivalents. You can also combine them with other "close" notes .. the major 2nd or the non-flattened third (which will create a "false relation" - plenty of these in Beatles songs - you wouldn't think those Fabs were so bluesy, would you?).

PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2009 8:54 pm
by Dayna
I would feel kind of proud if I got sore fingers from doing this, but it doesn't even hurt me much to press on the strings. & I've been doing it as much as I can. All I get are lines that go away pretty fast. I wonder if mine are already tough from things in the past, or maybe I really need to do more.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 06, 2009 10:24 pm
by Paul Inglis
Dayna wrote:I would feel kind of proud if I got sore fingers from doing this, but it doesn't even hurt me much to press on the strings. & I've been doing it as much as I can. All I get are lines that go away pretty fast. I wonder if mine are already tough from things in the past, or maybe I really need to do more.


Well, if it doesn't hurt you then more power to you! You should start to get little rough spots or calluses on the end of your fretting fingers after a while - unless the ends of your fingers are already rough.

What kind of guitar are you playing, Dayna? Maybe it just has a really low and/or easy action that doesn't require much effort.