Page 1 of 1

Russian Art

PostPosted: Sat Nov 27, 2010 7:08 pm
by Neil Foxlee

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:33 pm
by judith
It is a wonderful archive. I particularly liked the section on Russian Icons, complete with histories.

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 7:47 pm
by Neil Foxlee
I must thank the enthusiastic and unpretentious art historian Andrew Graham-Dixon for introducing me to Russian art in his BBC TV series on the subject - notably Ilya Repin and Mayakovsky's frescoes for the Moscow Metro station that bears his name. I much regret not being able to get to the Tretyakov art gallery on a recent visit to Moscow, so I've ordered Camilla Gray's The Russian Experiment in Art 1863-1922, which is a classic and an absolute steal, as compensation ( http://www.amazon.com/Russian-experimen ... 0810904659 ).

Not that I'm really much of an art buff, but still...

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 8:04 pm
by judith
Though Russian literature was my great love as a young reader, and when I had to listen to classical music, the Russian composers were amongst my favorites, I know very little about Russian Art which is weird because I probably studied art history more (formally). The Icons have always fascinated me though. Ah, according to one of the Amazon reviews, Camilla Gray is Prokofiev's daughter in law.

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 8:50 pm
by Ian M
If you are interested in Russian art, design and photography this is a truly excellent book:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Red-Star-Over-R ... pd_sim_b_2

It covers the explosion in art and design kicked off by the Revolution and is a visual record of a tumultuous time, as well as a tragic one. Stunning images.

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Mon Nov 29, 2010 9:09 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Thanks for that, Ian - looks like another essential purchase. The early 20th century in Russia was an incredible period. Some other recommendations: Dziga Vertov's film Man With a Movie Camera; Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita; the philosophy of language of the Bakhtin Circle; not to mention various composers and many, many others.

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 12:38 am
by judith
Thanks for the film recommendation, Neil. I just found "Man With A Movie Camera" on Netflix, I'll watch it this evening. I second "The Master and Margarita".

Ian, "Red Star Over Russia: A Visual History of the Soviet Union" comes highly recommended by the looks of it.

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 1:15 am
by Neil Foxlee
You can watch it for free here: http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid ... 1115932333 .

It's a silent film which has had various soundtracks over the years, including Michael Nyman (I saw it with live backing). The thing about it is that it was made (in 1929) when cinema was still relatively young, so the rules hadn't been established - it's a bit like Don Quixote or Tristram Shandy in that respect. I first came across when it was referenced by John Berger in Ways of Seeing, but there's a good essay on it at http://www.25hrs.org/vertov.htm .

Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_with_a_Movie_Camera .

In a very different but in some ways similar vein, there's Hellzapoppin' (1941), which also benefits from the presence of Slim and Slam, some great Lindyhopping and a Water Ballet. Here's the opening sequence:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b8okW69O4mY .

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 7:30 pm
by NormanD
Dziga Vertov (David Abelevich Kaufman)'s brother, Boris Kaufman, was also a noted cinematographer. His films included L'Atalante, On The Waterfront, and The Pawnbroker. A talented crew.

To Boris K, I dedicate this song from Bonny "Prince" Billy
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o874egfXbWY

Re: Russian Art

PostPosted: Tue Nov 30, 2010 7:43 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Boris was also the cameraman on Man with a Movie Camera,but I didn't know of his later work - quite a collection! Thanks, Norman.