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Luca Campigotto - My Wild Places

PostPosted: Sat Nov 13, 2010 10:24 am
by DavidM
I was just up in Venice recently, where I saw this photographic exhibition;

http://www.lucacampigotto.com/

The exhibition consists of images of landscapes; deserts, high mountains, ice-sheets, etc, where there's no particular focal point, but rather an expanse of desolation. They are all wide-angle shots which let the many small details accumulate into very powerful images. In most of the photos there is some small evidence of human activity, a dirt road or a walking track, but the over-riding impression is of an overwhelming natural world. Unfortunately, seeing them on a computer screen isn't going to give you much idea; they are all printed very large, 1 x 2 metres in some cases.

Here's a sample;
http://www.hatjecantz.de/controller.php?cmd=detail&titzif=00002719&lang=en
Just click on the images to the right of the book to open the selection.

Re: Luca Campigotto - My Wild Places

PostPosted: Mon Nov 15, 2010 8:19 pm
by judith
Thank you, David. I can imagine how impressive they would be on a large scale for 'vast' is a word that springs to mind and after looking at the great expanses, the derelict ship stuck in the ice and the stone human heads were almost a shock, confined and rigid in comparison to nature.

Re: Luca Campigotto - My Wild Places

PostPosted: Wed Nov 17, 2010 8:53 am
by DavidM
Here's a better reproduction of one of the largest photos in the exhibition, 110 x 270 cm;
http://www.museiciviciveneziani.it/frame.asp?musid=226&sezione=mostre

If you look carefully, down at the bottom of the picture you can see some fencing and a few people looking at the glacier. The contrast between the human and the natural is apparent.

The rest of this website gives a bit more information, in english, about the photographer, including a list of the locations.
http://www.museiciviciveneziani.it/frame.asp?pid=1946&musid=226&sezione=mostre

Re: Luca Campigotto - My Wild Places

PostPosted: Thu Nov 18, 2010 7:54 pm
by judith
There is such a poignancy about the photo - the tiny figures with their bit of prairie fenced in for pasture next to the uncontainable.

I haven't really enjoyed 'nature' photography this much since Ernst Haas (his collection titled "The Creation", for example). Yet, for me, Luca Campigotto's photos add a quiet statement, as mentioned above. And he does it so subtly.