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Treme

PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 2:54 am
by Jonathan E.
Anyone been watching this series set in New Orleans, made by David Simon of The Wire fame? (It's available somehow in the UK, but I'm not sure of the details.)

I've watched a couple of episodes on DVD here — and am not sure what to think. The music is, of course, great, but much of the dialog is a bit off. And there's something else that didn't seem right quite either. I'll probably keep watching, but here's a rather long piece (too long to paste in) from The New York Review of Books, several months ago, that provided some reasonable analysis and background. Some of you may find it worth reading, especially the more astute observers of US politics, society and culture among you.

http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2010/sep/30/charm-city-usa/

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 7:18 pm
by garth cartwright
I watched the first series on DVD while on holiday and def' would not have followed on TV (or if not on holiday). Great music but rather flat and unlikeable characters. A soap for highbrows.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue May 03, 2011 7:56 pm
by Jonathan E.
So I'm not alone in my reservations! But, I think I'll keep watching on a sort of intermittent basis, for the music if nothing else.

Also just watched Spike Lee's When The Levees Broke — made for rather grim watching and an unpleasant reminder of what went down. But there sure were a lot of unrealistic expectations expressed.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Sat May 14, 2011 2:46 pm
by Rob Hall
I've seen the first season. I have mixed feelings about it. There's much to be irritated by in it, and a couple of the characters are, as Garth says, pretty unlikeable. However, don't forget that, on the strength of just the first season, nobody knew just how good The Wire was going to get, so I shall seek out the second season of Treme in the hope that it develops into something better.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Mon May 16, 2011 6:05 pm
by Jonathan E.
We got through episode 3 with the comment that it's got just enough good stuff to keep you hanging on. Then episode 4 suddenly seemed to bring it all into focus and elevated the whole thing up a notch or two.

Strange to be watching at a time when New Orleans is near flooding again. As a hardcore environmental realist I feel one way, as a lover of Afro-American music and culture I feel quite another . . .

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Wed May 25, 2011 3:12 am
by Jonathan E.
Got hooked but good with episode 6. I'm a goner.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 1:35 am
by nikki akinjinmi
I'm ashamed to say I came to this series rather late. I think it's really, really good. Would say more but it's late and I need to sleep after watching an episode. Am on series 3, and trying to ration the remaining episodes until I can get hold of series 4. Thank you Maxine and Ted for the initial recommendation.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:41 am
by Jonathan E.
Wow! There's a season 4! I'd forgotten. But I checked and I'd watched it and so it might have been a little limp. But it was a short season, only 4 episodes and I was mighty distracted at the time — so maybe it's better than I remember.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:19 pm
by nikki akinjinmi
I have to say that I think it's a masterpiece of a series. It's worth sticking with it. Initially I did find certain characters annoying, and couldn't warm to them, and at times struggled with the pace of the dialogue, and the lighting of certain scenes - particularly in the first series - but managed to keep going. Garth, Rob, honestly I think it's worth sticking with it.

Re: Treme

PostPosted: Tue Mar 03, 2015 11:41 pm
by Rob Hall
I got through the first two series, and bought the 3rd on DVD, but never finished the box. Not sure if that says more about the series or me.

It was clearly David Simon's homage to the city and it's music, and it was very well done. I had a lot of time for John Goodman's character, and I'm a fan of Melissa Leo; the music was good and it was great the way they incorporated real live musicians into the story...

...it's just that the whole thing developed the air of something that was being done by numbers. I remain sympathetic towards what they were trying to do with the show but, for me, it remains part of the mix, rather than being something that stands out.