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Edtor's Liesense

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 9:58 am
by howard male
There seems to be a thing amongst editor types, to type almost incomprehensibly - perhaps to demonstrate to us mere foot-soldiers that they are even too busy to make sure their fingers land on the right keys in the right order, even when conveying the shortest and simplest of messages.

I can happily tolerate a lack of punctuation, no capital letters, or spelling mistakes (I'm the worst speller in the world), but take a look at these examples, cut and pasted from recent emails I've been sent - I've had many more. Names have been removed to protect the rushed:

tuesday plase


it shuld be in monday


at this stage i cant guarentee you a weekly review anyway becase of
space


yues review it pse
650 words the next mornign by 10.15


Is this a trend towards the email equivalent of the scrawled Doctor's prescription - unique to the media - or does everyone suffer these garbled messages in their work places? This is not a rhetorical question!

editorial speed

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:08 am
by Phil Meadley
I hear you Howard. I like the one word responses best, when you've just spent time trying to explain succinctly why something is a really worthwhile covering, or why you are unable to cover a certain event etc.

I wish I was in a position where I could tartly reply (with a garbled message) to people without fear of reprisal. I'd love to be able to use the 'overworked' tag as an excuse for blatant rudeness.

Write proper like what I does

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:17 am
by Con Murphy
Our very very senior manager (not sure what his official title is these days - CIO, CEO, C3P0, who knows?) has taken to emailing people in txtspk (that's text-speak for the literate among you). Now, some people would argue that young people today are effectively learning a new language with this pioneering brand of time-and-space-saving mobile phone and instant message communication, and I see some merit in that viewpoint. But in the more considered environment of online memo and/or letter writing that is email communication, it just comes across as at best posturing and at worst downright rude.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 10:21 am
by howard male
Phil wrote -

I like the one word responses best, when you've just spent time trying to explain succinctly why something is a really worthwhile covering, or why you are unable to cover a certain event etc.


This could turn into the equivalent of Monty Python's hardworking old Yorkshiremens Sketch:

"Blimey, you get a reply! Most of the time I don't even get that. And then two or three garbled words turn up, five minutes before band's due on stage, asking for 5000 words by t' time band's finished playing!"

ed spk

PostPosted: Wed Sep 28, 2005 12:21 pm
by Phil Meadley
I once had an editor rather snidley bring me up for getting the surname of someone wrong, but actually spell a word wrong in his reply. I rather cheekily quoted him and mentioned that it was easily done, which I don't think he liked very much.

Phil

PS I can't count the number of times my e-mails have been ignored, even when I needed some information urgently from them (the elusive spell-check shy).