Page 1 of 2

Next programme (9 Jan, 2009)

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 11:47 am
by Nigel w
Charlie - haven't you got a rather special programme coming up, which I was privileged to hear and watch from the other side of the glass when it was being recorded? Is it going out this Friday?

Re: Next programme

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:17 pm
by Charlie
Nigel w wrote: Is it going out this Friday?

Indeed, Nigel, well remembered. I have been waiting for the final track details from the Radio 3 production team in order to send out advance notice of the show with The Neighbourhood Guy himself. Having had a chance to listen to it in advance, it still feels good. Further info will be posted very soon.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:29 pm
by Nigel w
Well, all I will add without giving the game away is that it sounded fantastic at the time of recording and everyone should listen because they're in for a very special treat. I can't wait to hear it again...

How's that for a teaser ! But 'the Neighbourhood Guy himself' is a great description and I wonder if anybody will work it out from that before you reveal the full details?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:34 pm
by Con Murphy
Nigel w wrote:Well, all I will add without giving the game away is that it sounded fantastic at the time of recording and everyone should listen because they're in for a very special treat. I can't wait to hear it again...

How's that for a teaser ! But 'the Neighbourhood Guy himself' is a great description and I wonder if anybody will work it out from that before you reveal the full details?


Proximo programa clandestino? I thought I ought to point out that the 9th Jan show is already flagged up on the Radio 3 site and on the Home page of this one. Have the details changed?

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:42 pm
by Nigel w
I ought to point out that the 9th Jan show is already flagged up on the Radio 3 site and on the Home page of this one


Doh, so it is! I confess I never look at the home page...

anyway, havng had the honour to be present, it's a very special programme and includes some joyous live music...

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:54 pm
by NormanD
If anyone else is as irritated as I by such coyness, the home page tells us:

"Charlie Gillett is joined in the BBC's Maida Vale studios by world music star Manu Chao, who plays an acoustic solo session and introduces his favourite tracks."
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00gdbqt

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 12:57 pm
by Con Murphy
NormanD wrote:If anyone else is as irritated as I by such coyness,


Irritated? Amused, maybe. It reads like a 'soft' question on PMQs - "would the Prime Minister like to join me in congratulating the Government on another fine set of crime prevention figures from the Home Office?"

Only kidding, I'm sure it is every bit as good as Nigel says.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 1:07 pm
by Nigel w
Norman wrote

If anyone else is as irritated as I by such coyness,


Norman,not my job to announce who Charlie has got on the programme : three days to go and he hadn't posted it in this thread and I wondered why. I wasn't going to blurt it out when he hadn't put it up here himself - not realising that it was flagged on the home page all along!

It is a great show and I don't want people to miss it, that's all. Some of the songs people will know from the 'produced' LP versions sound absolutely stunning with just an acoustic guitar - and in that strpped-down setitng you also suddenly realise what a bloody great singing voice the guy has , which is something I'd never really noticed on the records...

''The neighbourhood guy himself'' is a great descrption, as you will hear from the programme. DON'T MISS IT !

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 1:10 pm
by NormanD
I do recall his BBC London Ping-Pong show years back. He was armed with his child-size nylon string guitar and chose at least one soul music obscurity. Agreed, not to be missed.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 1:42 pm
by Charlie
NormanD wrote:I do recall his BBC London Ping-Pong show years back. He was armed with his child-size nylon string guitar and chose at least one soul music obscurity. Agreed, not to be missed.

When people ask, which was your best-ever Ping Pong, that is in the top two or three. He still has that toy guitar, and Manu's idea of the ultimate compliment is to call somebody a neighbourhood guy. It seems to apply to him too, so I'm going to use it till you tell me to stop.

PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2009 6:50 pm
by Charlie
Since the first bout of radio ping pong, on Radio London back in 1995, one of the shows that remains vivid in the memory was when Manu Chao came in with a guitar that looked it must belong to some kid he met in the street outside. Clandestino was brand new back then, a revelation that was already causing shock waves throughout Europe and across Latin America. In the UK, his record label Virgin was so disinterested, they let somebody else put it out. Now Manu is in better hands, looked after by Because Records, whose boss Emmanuel de Buretel has been a believer since he himself worked at Virgin France.

Since that time, Manu has been busy on every level, keeping his own career afloat by touring while also lending a hand to play guitar as a guest on other people's records (and thereby boosting their visibility by association with him), or sitting in to help change a lyric here and there. Most conspicuously, in 2005 he produced the album Dimanche a Bamako, finally launching the career of the Malian duo, Amadou & Mariam.

Right now, Manu is still working to promote last year's album La Radiolina, which for me was a half-and-half record, with many pretty songs almost lost among too many rockers. Did I say this to him on this recent visit? I did not. He knows what he is doing, and why.

We did have a very enjoyable conversation in which Manu several times referred to the kind of musician he likes best, Neighbourhood Guys, he calls them, people who will play live in the street or in a bar, who don’t have to be paid to play, but just get pleasure from doing it. Manu is himself the ultimate Neighbourhood Guy, based in Barcelona, but still loyal to Galicia, where his father is from. One of the songs Manu sings in this show is in Galician, with an almost unrecognisable style and voice.

Manu's father, Ramon, accompanied his two sons, Manu and Antoine, in 1993 when their band Mano Negra travelled across Colombia on a train that took a route which did not really exist. Engineers had to get off and lay down track so they could continue. Ramon's book has been available in Spanish for some time, but has just come out in English this year, titled the Train of ice and Fire, published by Route Books. www.route-online.com/

The playlist is shown below, but I hope you set it aside to check later. Leave yourself some surprises to discover.

Next week, Jan 16, our live guest will be Felix Lajko, the Hungarian/Serbian violin virtuoso who makes his own rules, follows no obvious generic path, and always leaves me speechless with wonder. In the studio with me is Garth Cartwright, whose book Princes Amongst Men is justifiably gaining a reputation as one of the best music books of recent years. Since writing it, Garth has been to the United States to research the follow-up, More Miles Than Money.

The Manu Chao programme was produced for Radio 3 by Roger Short; the Felix Lajko/Garth Cartwright programme was produced by Felix Carey.

Listen again on iPlayer

Comments welcome as always in the forum at www.soundoftheworld.com

Seq Artist Song Title Album Country Label Cat no

1 Alberto Pacheco Cumbia Cienaguera Arriba la Cumbia Colombia Crammed Discs CRAW 49

2 Manu Chao La Vida Tombola La Radiolina France/Spain Because BEC721258

3 Manu Chao Amalucada Vida In session Spain

Radio Ping Pong with Manu Chao (*)
4 Jorge Ben Ponta de Lanca Africane Beleza Tropical Braxil Luaka Bop VVR 1019642

*5 Carotone Casillero album title unknown Spain EMI Spain details unknown

6 Liqor de negro café Planeta Grelos Mariatchi Boogie Spain (Galicia) Estofonia Riera UMA10253844F08

7 Manu Chao Carratero In session Spain

8 Zebda Le plus Beau Utøpie D’Occase France Universal 065088-2

*9 ONB Non, Je Ne Regrette Rien Je Vous Salis ma Rue France
*10 ONB Alaou En Concert France Virgin 8440092

*11 SMOD Tadeja No Rastar Mali Because promo

12 Manu Chao Mala Fama (Bad Reputation) In session Spain

13 Buika Volver Volver niña el fuego Spain Atlantic 256 469 5477

*14 Nando Boom El Desorden Various: Dancehall Reggaespanol Panama Sony B00000281V

15 Mano Negra Guayacil City Puta's Fever France Virgin 30721

14 Manu Chao Mr Bobby In session Spain

15 Kobo Town Abatina Independence Konbo Town Kobo 1

*16 Batata y su Rumba Palenquera medley Radio Bakongo Colombia Network Medien 24.1237

17 Manu Chao La Vida Tombola In session Spain

*18 Mano Negra Santa Maradona Casa Babylon France Virgin 7243 8 39655 2 6

*19 Manu Chao Bongo Bong Clandestino France/Spain Virgin 821838 129028

*20 Manu Chao Mentira Clandestino France/Spain Virgin 821838 129028

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 11:25 am
by Paul Sherratt
One to remember, that .
Well done to all concerned.

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 11:49 am
by Alan
Listen again (a must) for 7 days at http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/b00gdbqt

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 12:21 pm
by Nigel w
Terrific stuff... Charlie certainly knows how to get the best out of 'the neighbourhood guy'.

Fantastic versions of Mala Fama and Mr Bobby. I said to Manu after the recording that he should put out a solo acoustic album - may be even just a whole 'unplugged' version of La Radiolina.

He didn't dismiss the idea out of hand, and the person present from his record label said they had also been pushing a similar idea at him...

PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2009 2:25 pm
by Charlie
Nigel w wrote:Terrific stuff... Charlie certainly knows how to get the best out of 'the neighbourhood guy'.

Thanks, Nigel, although I think Manu just naturally gets the best out of himself, and my only achivement was not to inhibit him but to make sure he realised that this show was his platform, to do whatever he felt like.

Regarding that 'neighbourhood guy' concept: the day before this show went out, a young man came round to take measurements for a new front door for my basement. There are basically two kinds of reaction from such people when they see what looks like a record shop or library. Some just blank out what they have seen, but a few dare to ask, 'what do you do?', or say things like, 'I thought I had a lot of records'.

This particular man, called Adam (like your son, Nigel), asked enough questions to discover that my guest the next day was going to be Manu Chao. "I met him a few months ago" said Adam. "I was sitting with some friends in the Firefly at Clapham South, and one of my friends said, 'that's Manu Chao' as a guy walked in. We invited him to join us, and he chatted away for half an hour, really friendly. When I told another friend about it, he said exactly thre same thing had happend to him, when he was sitting in a pub in Brixton. Manu had walked in, and joined in conversation with his group of friends."

Point proved.