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Sept 1 (Massukos, Baobab) & 8 (Les Triaboliques)

PostPosted: Thu Aug 28, 2008 11:25 pm
by Charlie
Monday, 1 Sept:

NB, starts 15 minutes later than usual, 11.30 pm

The Mozambique group Massukos, with four songs recorded in the studio at Broadcasting House, and Orchestra Baobab with three recorded live on the Radio 3 Stage at WOMAD on Sunday evening. [Strictly speaking, not the entire Orchestra Baobab line-up, but six members making a remarkably full sound.]

Monday, 8 Sept:

Radio debut by Les Triaboliques
Ben Mandelson, Lu Edmunds and Justin Adams, play four songs and also take part in a four-hander conversation with records. [Plus one song performed by Sa Dingding without the Andrew Lloyd-Webber production approach, proving what a good singer she is.]

PostPosted: Sun Aug 31, 2008 7:22 pm
by judith
Yay!

Playlist for Monday, 1 September 2008 (starts at 23.30)

PostPosted: Mon Sep 01, 2008 5:01 pm
by Charlie
Playlist for Monday, 1 September 2008 (starts later at 11.30pm)

Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Sissoko, El Mamouni, Rajery - Toufoula - 3MA - Mali, Morocco, Madagascar - Contre Jour - CJ020

2 - Bako Dagnon - Salimou - Titati - Mali - Discograph - 613 3012

[The previous programme, from the Proms, over-ran, so the two records above were unheard, making nonsense of my introduction which suggests that you would have heard them both. I was reassured that the Online version would be the complete show but it faithfully recreates the broadcast so you still don't hear the first two records. What you do hear is about two thirds of this record by Aretha Franklin, co-produced by Jerry Wexler, who died recently. Incidentally, I played 'Do Right Woman' from the compilation Global Divas because the mastering sounds better on this album than on any other.]

3 - Aretha Franklin - Do Right Woman-Do Right Man - Global Divas - USA - Rounder - CD 5062/3/4

4 - Orchestra Baobab * - Ami Kita Bay - Live at Radio 3 Stage, WOMAD - Senegal - -

5 - Devon Sproule - 1340 Chesapeake St - Keep Your Silver Shined - USA - Tin Angel - TAR001

6 - Massukos - Pangira - Live at Broadcasting House - Mozambique - -

7 - Massukos - Afrika - Live at Broadcasting House - Mozambique

8 - Kiran Ahluwalia - Yakeenan - Wanderlust - India - World Connection - WC 43070

9 - Odetta w/ The Holmes Brothers - Two Little Fishes and Five Loaves of Bread - Shout, Sister, Shout! Tribute to Sister Rosetta Tharpe - USA - MC - MC 0050

10 - Orchestra Baobab * - Cabral - Live at Radio 3 Stage, WOMAD - Senegal - -

11 - Chiwoniso - Matsotsi - Rebel Woman - Zimbabwe - Cumbancha - CMB-CD8

12 - Liz Green - Midnight Blues - Single - UK - Humble Soul - HS207

13 - Issa Bagayogo - Poye - Mali Koura - Mali - Six Degrees - 657036 v1151 2

14 - Massukos - Mulilanji - Live at Broadcasting House - Mozambique

15 - Massukos - Niassa - Live at Broadcasting House - Mozambique

16 - Orchestra Baobab * - Colette - Live at Radio 3 Stage, WOMAD - Senegal

* Special line-up of Orchestra Baobab:
Barthelemey Atisso (guitar)
Balla Sidibe (timbales, vocal)
Rudy Gomis (vocals & congas)
Ndiouga Dieng (vocal,congas)
Thierno Koite (tenor sax)
Latfi Benjeloun (guitar)
Charles Ndiaye (bass)

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:10 am
by RussellC
This was a great choice of music and not diminished by the over-running Prom (which included sitar music anyway). In fact I switched on late, in the middle of Do Right Woman, so was initially unaware of the missing part. It must have been frustrating for CG, and it was a pity they couldn’t upload the whole show to i-player.

I had thought the 28 July broadcast was going to be solely CG's presentation from the previous night’s Womad, but it appeared plans had changed. Therefore it was great to hear Orchestra Baobab’s set on this programme. Massukos were equally sublime and I had the impression they were actually live including your interview rather than pre-record.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 05, 2008 11:58 am
by Charlie
RussellC wrote: Massukos were equally sublime and I had the impression they were actually live including your interview rather than pre-record.

Thanks Russell, for what is the first reaction to this show in this forum. I was beginning to wonder if anybody heard it. It was extremely frustrating that after a late scheduled start (11.30, instead of the usual 11.15), it then didn't begin until almost 11.45. I could only imagine listeners losing patience and going to bed. I remember feeling sympathy for Andy Kershaw when his shows seemed to be treated in a rather cavalier fashion, being cut back here and dropped there, to make room for live classical concerts. So it's curious to be sharing that experience myself now. But this has been the first such instance during my time at Radio 3, rather than a regular occurrence.

As for the Massukos session, they performed live in the studio with me asking questions between each pair of songs. Unusually this show was stitched together from three elements - Massukos at Broadcasting House early in July, Baobab at WOMAD three weeks later and the records slotted in around them a few days ago.

Regarding that show of July 28, I would have preferred to present the onstage show as an entity as you hoped, including the records played in between the live performances. But the Radio 3 line is that they have so much material recorded over the WOMAD weekend, it wouldn't make sense to use valuable time playing records in one of the few time slots available for presenting the WOMAD performances.

I'm featuring one of Sa Dinding's songs from the Radio 3 stage at WOMAD in next Monday's programme.

PostPosted: Sat Sep 06, 2008 1:21 pm
by Gordon Neill
Thanks to the wonders of the BBC iplayer, I didn't listen to this until this morning (11.30 pm on a Monday is getting very near my bedtime).

What a shame the first two songs were missing. Those were the two that I was most looking forward to hearing. But another enjoyable show. I was a bit worried about the high folk content (two songs!), but Liz Green's 'Midnight Blues' turned out to be my favourite track of the show. What a fantastic voice and a lovely understated backing. Perhaps I'm becoming a folkie. Oh dear.

PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 10:11 am
by Charlie
Gordon Neill wrote: Liz Green's 'Midnight Blues' turned out to be my favourite track of the show. What a fantastic voice and a lovely understated backing. Perhaps I'm becoming a folkie. Oh dear.

I doubt that Ian A would class Liz as folk, Gordon, even if she does play guitar and come from Manchester. She's surely just a singer songwriter with an excellent tone. You don't get stand-up bass playing like this on folk records.

Incidentally, the record reached me by the most perfect, circuitous route. After I was a guest on Tom Robinson's 6 Music show, his producer Henry Lopez-Real handed me the Liz Green CD saying it was a spare copy of a record he thought I might like. That's usually a scary introduction - not many people can guess the taste of eccentric radio DJs. But Henry was formerly a producer (of other people's shows) at GLR and he knows.....

But was Karen Dalton a folkie?

PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2008 11:33 pm
by Gordon Neill
Charlie assured me that:

I doubt that Ian A would class Liz as folk


Phew!

Of course, I was just being a bit lazy in thinking the worst of someone brandishing an acoustic guitar. Singers should be assumed to be innocent unless proven folkie. But I think it was my subconscious that made me blurt out that dreaded 'f' word. It had noticed a vague similarity in tone between Liz Green and Karen Dalton, a Greenwhich Village folky-bluesy person from the 60s.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y-BIKjypNsE

Re: But was Karen Dalton a folkie?

PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 10:35 am
by Charlie
Gordon Neill wrote:Karen Dalton, a Greenwhich Village folky-bluesy person from the 60s.

I doubt Karen would pass Ian's folk detector test either - she was basically a singer songwriter who happened to sing in folk clubs because they were the only place for such a person to play in the 1960s

PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2008 11:07 am
by NormanD
Karen Dalton was a banjo player / guitarist / singer who started off playing "folk music" (ie old songs from the American tradition) and then moved on to recording a combination of older songs by players like Leadbelly and Jelly Roll Morton and newer contemporaries like Fred Neill, Tim Hardin and Percy Sledge, as well as her own material.

She was "folk" in so far as she was part of the New York early-60s music scene. As much folk as her then club contemporaries Dylan, Tom Paxton, Phil Ochs, etc. Were she still alive she'd no doubt be lumped in with, say, Norah Jones or Cassandra Wilson. Back then, anyone who played an acoustic in a club was termed "folk". Who cares? Just listen to her, please.

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 10:38 am
by Charlie
Gordon Neill wrote:Liz Green's 'Midnight Blues' turned out to be my favourite track of the show. What a fantastic voice and a lovely understated backing. Perhaps I'm becoming a folkie. Oh dear.

Now I've heard her (only) previous single, Bad Medicine, and must go along with your first analysis, Gordon. She probably is a folk singer after all. And I still do like her.

Norman rightly asked what does it matter, so long as it's good? It only matters for people like Gordon and me, who had become convinced we were never likely to like somebody who is classed as a folk singer. In many ways, it would be a great relief to discover this is possible after all. I am considering offering Liz an invitation to come and do a session for me. But we still have to wait to see if she gets interviewed/reviewed in fRoots. Until then, as they say, the jury is out.

Meanwhile, for those in the journalist/DJ professions, the person to contact for copies of both Liz Green singles is Emma at Rocket POR

email

PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2008 10:45 am
by Charlie
email from John Stewart

Hi Charlie

I hope there's a beeb tribunal you can complain to for cutting the front off your programme yesterday evening. The rest was most enjoyable, as, I have to confess was the prom raga. You were probably there?

I'm catching you too on the weldservice as I hear them say,,, John

Massukos

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 3:11 am
by brian ndebele
I could have kicked myself for having missed Charlie’s Massukos (Mozambique) interview. Ever since meeting the group back in June 2008, I often find myself playing the “BUMPINGâ€

Re: Massukos

PostPosted: Thu Oct 08, 2009 10:00 am
by Charlie
brian ndebele wrote:Charlie, have you interviewed Amadou and Miriam yet? (The Magic Couple Mali)

As you obviously discovered by digging this out, one of the many advantages of this forum, Brian, is that the archive stretches back a long way, and under the menu tab on the home page linking to old Radio London shows you can find the account of what happened with A & M came in on 24 September 2005.

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:07 pm
by RussellC
What a small forum this is (not). Disappointed to find that I missed the Massukos performance on my local BBC station, and surprised to be name-checked by Brian. Perhaps he saw that I live in Luton, and not far from the studio (and we may have met).