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Natacha Atlas - 16 June, 11.15pm (online for 7 days)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 11:16 am
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - St Augustine & His Rovers Dance Band - Onwu Ama Dike - Nigeria Special: - Nigeria - Sound Way - SNDWCD009

2 - Mamani Keita & Nicolas Repac - Djama Nyemao - Yelema - Mali/France - No Format - NDF 9

Live session with Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble:
Harvey Brough (piano/acoustic guitar/backing vocals); Clara Sanabras (baroque guitar/ukulele/vocals); Louai Alhenawi (ney); Neil Charles (double bass); Aly Abdel Alim (percussion/backing vocals); Samy Bishai (violin); Julian Ferraretto (viola); Ian Burdge (cello)

3 - Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble - Beny Ou Benak Eih - live in session - UK - -

4 - Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble - Ana Hina (I'm Here) - live in session - UK - -

Radio Ping Ping with Natacha and the band (* their choices)

5 - Stepanida Borisova - Khappytyan! - Vocal Evocations of Sakha-Yakutia, Siberia (1) - Russia (Siberia) - SOAS - SOAS 1517

6* - Fairuz - Ma Baaref (I never knew that I love you) - Mechwar (Journey) - Lebanon - DpH -

7 - Seckou Keita Quartet - Miniyamba (feat Binta Suso) - The Silimbo Passage - Gambia/UK - World Adventures - WA 2008

8* - Abdel Halim Hafez - Awel Marra Teheb (The First Time) - Maweed Gharam (Original Soundtrack - Egypt - EMI Music Arabia - 310597-2

9 - Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble - He Hesitated - live in session - UK - -

10 - Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble - La Vida Callada (The Unspoken Life) - live in session - UK -

11 - Belasco's Orchestra feat Houdini - Blow Wind Blow - Rough Guide to Calypso Gold - Trinidad - World Music Network - RGNET1213

12 - Umalali - Merua - Garifuna Women's Project - Belize - Cumbancha - CMB-CD-6

Tributes to musicians who died recently **

**13 - Bo Diddley - You Can't Judge a Book by Looking at Its Cover - The Chess Story Box Set - USA - Chess - MCA 380 606-2

**14 - Saban Bajramovic - Pena - Mostar Sevdah Reunion presents: A Gyspsy Legend - Serbia - World Connection - WC 43024

**15 - Jimmy Giuffre - The Train & the River - The Jimmy Giuffre 3 - USA - Atlantic Jazz - 7567-90981-2

16 - Rokia Traore - Aimer - Tchamantché - Mali - Nonesuch - promo

17 - Little Willie John - Fever - The Early King Sessions - USA - Ace - CDCHD 846

**18 - Sonny Okosun - Fire in Soweto - Fire in Soweto - Nigeria - EMI Nigeria -

19 - Balla et ses Balladins - Ka Noutea - The Syliphone Years - Guinea Conakry - Sterns - SRCD3035-36

20 - Uun Budiman and the Jugala Gamelan Orchestra - Bayu Bayu (The Winds) - Banondari: New Directions in Jaipongan - Java (Indonesia) - Felmay - fy8098

PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 4:40 pm
by mike gavin
Nice show Charlie (sorry this is a bit late). I'd take issue with you about big bands being necessarily bland or less exciting. In the American context there's Mingus who had some huge groups and was utterly compelling, Ellington, of course, Sun Ra could really rock with 15 musicians. In some ways there's nothing better than a great big band tearing away.

M

PostPosted: Tue Jun 17, 2008 11:56 pm
by Des
I only had a chance to hear the first half hour so look forward to listening to it all, especially the new Rokia Traore track. I loved the Mamani Keita tune.

I must admit Natacha Atlas just doesn't do it for me though - I've never understood her appeal. Never mind.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 12:17 am
by nikki akinjinmi
I really like the St Augustine & His Rovers tune - I must have played it about 20 times, so far.

Interesting tune. It started off as though it was going to be a latin tune, then morphed into calypso feeling tune, with that lovely bass rhythm pattern (reminded me of a dub groove), then the tune sort of reminded me of Camden's nutty boys - Madness (in their early days) - I could picture Suggs doing a dance to it.

Then the tune sort of reminded me of the kind of thing Sonny Rollins used to do, and to some extent the music of Pharoah Sanders and Joe Zawinul. The percussive break reminded of a Afro-Cuban groove. Then near the end there is the lovely sprinkling of guitar. This is beautiful. I also like the "muddy" sound of the recording.

I am playing it again via the listen again as I write. Beautiful. I think I will have to get the album it comes from.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 1:22 am
by Dayna
I loved hearing Natacha Atlas. She really has a beautiful voice.
Mamani Keita music was very pretty.

And the Soukou Keita Quartet was very pretty music.

Saban Bajramovic - Pena I remember his song from the World 2006 CD & liked it a lot. I didn't reeally get familiar with his name enough to recognise him, till now.

I loved this too ;Jimmy Giuffre - The Train & the River
Little Willie John

Balla et ses Balladins - Ka Noutea - The Syliphone Years; I love this! It reminds me of Orchestra Baobab mixed with something else.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:27 am
by Charlie
mike gavin wrote: I'd take issue with you about big bands being necessarily bland or less exciting. In the American context there's Mingus who had some huge groups and was utterly compelling, Ellington, of course, Sun Ra could really rock with 15 musicians. In some ways there's nothing better than a great big band tearing away.

Either you or I have muddled up two different comments I was making, Mike. On the one hand, it's true that I was grumbling about the syrupy nature of those big Middle East orchestras and saying I preferred the stripped down version of the Mazeeka Ensemble.

But my reference to cutting down the size of American big bands in the 1940s was economic, not aesthetic, observing that once Louis Jordan showed he could get away with an eight-piece, promoters were less happy to pay for 16 musicians.

I did see the Count Basie Band in full force at the Newcastle Town Hall in 1960 and was literally blown away by the horn section. Even half way back in the stalls, we could feel the wind when all those trumpets and trombonists blasted away together. Very thrilling!

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 3:13 pm
by Paul Sherratt
Just thought I'd repeat my brief comment from that quieter place, " Looks good, tastes good and by golly it does you good "


Ta.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2008 10:26 pm
by ralphyt
a great show from monday charlie. i loved miss atlas' last album but was less taken with what i'd heard from the new one - until the show. the ensemble were amazing, perfection - tight - and almost like we were listening to a cd rather than a rough round the edges live performance. cue a forum debate about the merits of live v recorded music.....

also struck by how english natascha sounds. i know she's british by way of belgium via egypt or something but i was (pleasantly) surprised by her accent - less souk more thames gateway?

btw, recently returned from another sojourn to france where i am always amazed by the quality of their public service radio stations. think the one the missus tuned into was hosted by rennes university. cracking stuff, reggae and west african stuff through to electronica. very refreshing - i'll post the link here if i can find it.

PostPosted: Thu Jun 19, 2008 10:40 pm
by cenawes
Excelllent show again!

You hit the nail on the head, Charlie, when you said you've basically stuck with pop music since the '50s. That's why I like your programmes (and why I liked Andy K's): they're not elitist and you understand the basic sex'n'dancing impetus.

When are Radio 3 (or Radio 2 or Radio whatever) going to give you a weekly show?

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2008 4:06 pm
by Adam Blake
Lovely to hear Natacha singing so well and obviously enjoying herself. In many ways, Charlie, I think you got better versions than are on the album. Perhaps because she and the band (or tea room orchestra might be a more accurate description) have gigged the material a bit since it was recorded.

Thinking about your comments about pop and jazz after playing that gorgeous Jimmy Giuffre track - there were a couple weren't there? Such as "Take Five" by the Dave Brubeck Quartet (actually written by alto sax player Paul Desmond), "Grazing In The Grass" by Hugh Masekela, and dare I mention "Stranger On The Shore"? Perhaps not...

emails

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 11:21 am
by Charlie
email from:

R Allibone, Tamworth

great to hear the train and the river.

but your comments regarding chuck berry and jack teagarden being ill advised, i find a little disapionting. were their musics so far apart ? i don't think so but it is along time ago for us to remember.

anyway you can get access to the soundtrack version of t a r on film EVEN better than record.

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 12:55 pm
by Adam Blake
What's lovely about Chuck Berry being backed up by a bunch of New Orleans Trad jazzers is the way they feel their way into what Berry is doing. I'd love to have heard the rest of the set, or to know at what point of the set that rendition of "Sweet Little 16" came. At the start of the number, Berry is virtually holding it up on his own, by the end of it the band are seriously rocking. But they are not playing rock'n'roll, they are playing rock'n'roll as New Orleans Trad jazz. And it works! At least it does to my ears. The clarinet player (is it Barney Bigard?) plays a red hot solo with Chuck Berry comping like a mother underneath. It's also great because Chuck has to work so hard. I know what you mean about the mis-match of styles but it's actually one of my favourite moments in the film precisely because of this.

PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2008 8:32 pm
by will vine
Adam Blake wrote:The clarinet player (is it Barney Bigard?) plays a red hot solo with Chuck Berry comping like a mother underneath. It's also great because Chuck has to work so hard. I know what you mean about the mis-match of styles but it's actually one of my favourite moments in the film precisely because of this.


Yes it's a glorious few moments, the uneasy outing of rock'n'roll on a jazz stage. Wonderful, as you say, for the way they all appear to be striving gallantly towards a common goal, and seeming to kinda miss Chuck's vision and yet hit something great at the same time.

My memory is that the clarinet player was Peanuts Hucko...but who's counting?

PostPosted: Mon Jun 30, 2008 10:36 am
by Charlie
email from Harvey Brough

Hello Charlie, I enjoyed doing that programme for you with Natacha, sorry it was a bit chaotic, always is around Nat somehow. What lovely music you played, I bought that Jimmy Guiffre album which is such a joy, I can't believe I've known of him for so long and not listened properly. I love it!

Everyone tells me the Mazeeka band sounded great but I was away and didn't get to hear it.

Hope all is well with you and keep up the good work

best

Harvey

Re: Natacha Atlas - 16 June, 11.15pm (online for 7 days)

PostPosted: Wed Mar 14, 2012 2:16 pm
by Alan
Live session with Natacha Atlas & the Mazeeka Ensemble:
World On 3, BBC Radio 3, 16 June 2008


If anyone has a recording of this programme, please could they send me a pm - I'd really appreciate it

Thanks

Alan