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Wasis Diop: June 9, 11.15 pm (online for 7 days)

PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2008 6:22 pm
by Charlie
CG with Wasis Diop singing & playing guitar, and an exchange of records (his choices marked *):

Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Balla et ses Balladins - Ka Noutea - The Syliphone Years - Guinea Conakry - Sterns - STCD3035-36

2 - Pama International - Highrise - Love Filled Dub Band - UK - Pama Int - RRHITCD2

3 - Sa Ding Ding - Oldster by Xilin River - Alive - China - Wrasse - WRASS 213

4 - Umalali - Merua - Garifuna Women's Project - Belize - Cumbancha - CMB-CD-6

5 - Wasis Diop - So La La - Live in session - Senegal - -

6 - Wasis Diop - L'Ange Djibril (without capo) - Live in session - Senegal - -

7 - Wasis Diop - L'Ange Djibril (with capo) - Live in session - Senegal - -

8 - Son of Dave - Lover Not a Fighter - O3 - Canada - Kartel - KCDL013

*9 - Ding Fei Fei - Le Dernier Qui A Parlé - Dare to be Different - China - Universal - 016 281-2,

10 - Yasuaki Shimizu & Saxophonettes - Suite no.1 Prélude - Cello Suites - Japan - Saravah - SHL2098

*11 - Papa Wemba: - Yolele - V/A: Madre Africa - DR Congo - Mercury - 553 125-2

12 - Djoloff - Metite - Lawane - Senegal - Emma - 159 498-2

*13 - Talking Heads: - Once in a Lifetime - Remain In Light - USA - Sire Records - K 256867
-
14 - Wasis Diop: - Tuti Sop - Live in session - Senegal - -

15 - Wasis Diop: - Digge (Le Gong a Sonne) - Live in session - Senegal - -

16 - DeVotchKa - twenty-six temptations - How It Ends - USA - Anti - 6895-2

17 - Yasmin Levy - Una Nocha Mas - Mano Suave - Israel - World Village - 450003

18 - Burkina Electric - Mdolé - Rêem Tekré - Burkina Faso/USA - Ata Tak - WRS04

19 - Ry Cooder - Can I Smoke in Here? - I, Flathead - USA - Nonesuch - 7559 799 343

20 - CéU - Lenda - CéU - Brazil - Six Degrees - 657036 1129-2

21 - Romica Puceanu - Unde o-fie puiul de aseara - Princes Amongst Men - Journeys with Gypsy Musicians - Romania - Asphalt Tango - CD-ATR 1608

22 - Augusto Santos - Si Me la dan la cojo - Bachata Rosa - Dominican Republic - iASO - iASCD3

23 - Dog Murras - Kamussekele [NB - fade by 4.00] - Rough Guide to African Street Party - Angola - World Music Network - RGNET1201CD

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 1:56 pm
by nikki akinjinmi
Charlie, I really enjoyed the programme.

I particularly enjoyed the first song you played from Guinea, the Garifuna Women's Project, I preferred Wasis's first version of "Hallelujah", without the capo, the second version was good too, Djoloff, the Bach composition, the Burkina Electric, Romica Puceanu, Son Of Dave. I liked the juxtaposition of things. It was good - so good, that instead of going to bed early - I stayed and listened until the heard the final note of music.

Maybe I should post this on the BBC 3 message board.

PostPosted: Tue Jun 10, 2008 5:50 pm
by Des
Yep this was an awesome programme and had me listening till the bitter end (but only because I've got the week off work!) So many great tracks, Burkina Electric was very haunting.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 9:58 am
by Charlie
Thanks Nikki and Des. The DJ never does take anything for granted, so it's a relief to find at least two people liked this programme. I worried about it for all sorts of reasons, but there's no point in drawing them to your attention if they didn't bother you.

On the Radio 3 message board, WaterHeart Song (registered as 'whs' here) posted the lyric of a Thea Gilmore song that challenges radio to be more interesting, and suggested that 'DJs should play music from the whole of history and not just play things that have recently been released. It would certainly make for more entertaining programmes.'

Ian Russell followed up with a further comment that encapsulated the argument pretty well:

'just pick out something at random from your past and ask yourself ''why did I used to like this?'', then play a track and tell us why you thought it was good and whether it still is. Be experimental. It's almost two hours, Mr. DJ!'

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 2:09 pm
by Ian M
Wasis Diop was great. I really enjoyed the intimacy of hearing him with just guitar. His voice is wonderful- deep and warm and soulful, reminded me of Richie Havens - you just want to bathe in the mood they create. I also liked the spontaneity of it revealed, as when Wasis had to restart - normally you expect this stuff to be edited out, but leaving it as it was increases the feeling that he has just dropped round to your living room. And what a great version of a song already covered by all sorts of people - another quite different take on it. And did he really say he was doing an opera? Didn't quite catch it, but an intriguing prospect, if that is what he's doing.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 2:16 pm
by Charlie
Ian M wrote:And did he really say he was doing an opera? Didn't quite catch it, but an intriguing prospect, if that is what he's doing.

Yes, Wasis has written an opera that involves an ensemble of 50 musicians and singers from across Western Africa, which has been performed in Belgium and France but there are no set plans for a UK show.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 11, 2008 3:03 pm
by Ian M
Charlie wrote:Yes, Wasis has written an opera that involves an ensemble of 50 musicians and singers from across Western Africa, which has been performed in Belgium and France but there are no set plans for a UK show.


Womad, or some other summer event, calling....

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 2:17 am
by Dayna
The show sounded great. Wasis Diop has a beautiful soothing voice.

I liked this Djoloff - Metite, a lot. I don't think I've ever heard a kora used this way. it's very good.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 13, 2008 3:29 pm
by David Flower
terrific show Charlie. I'm still listening you know!

PostPosted: Sun Jun 15, 2008 11:16 pm
by Gordon Neill
I feel like the horse that was so late getting home, he tiptoed into the stable. But, thanks to the wonders of the BBC iplayer, it is now possible to leave things later and later. And I do.

I was puzzled by Charlie's stated worries about the show. I looked out for the gaffes or clangers with keen anticipation. Sadly, all I heard was another terrific show. Wasis Diop was great. I loved the intimate feeling of the acoustic guitar and that voice. Among the tracks, the one by Yasuaki Shimizu & Saxophonettes was the most startling. Funny and beautiful.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 16, 2008 10:25 pm
by nikki akinjinmi
BTW, I didn't realise that Wasis' brother had directed (and/or produced) a film which I really do like, Touki Bouki.

I have tried to get this on a dvd, but I haven't managed to get hold of a copy. It's a great film.