Page 1 of 1

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 4:06 pm
by gordonfmoore
I've just been listening to the shows - I have to record them for listening during my school holidays, otherwise they don't get the attention they deserve. I had about two months worth ready and then the bombshell.

Like many others I am aghast that there is no more. I am even more aghast that I hadn't realised and belated best wishes for a speedy recovery to you.

The World Service is some compensation, but it was the interviews/discussions and ping pong that made it for me.

I remember when I first heard world music late one night on the World Service, when I couldn't sleep. I was stunned by the breadth and variety of the music I heard.

You were generous enough to reply to an email I sent to you and started me on a new period of musical discovery. I can't thank you enough for that.

I know that you will find a new vehicle, when you are better, to inform, educate and entertain us with your discoveries.

All the best to you and yours

Gordon

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 5:57 pm
by will vine
[quote="gordonfmoore"]I've just been listening to the shows - I have to record them for listening during my school holidays, otherwise they don't get the attention they deserve. I had about two months worth ready and then the bombshell.

It is a measure of Charlie's popularity and indispensability that even from the earliest days of "Honky Tonk" we would all put out pleas from time to time for tape recordings of any show we happened to miss. We were devoted fans needing our weekly fix. Somebody would always answer the call. It occurred to me that someone might be able to dig out a few back numbers for Gordon (or anyone else). I'll see what I can find.

I am reminded of an episode of Frasier where the obsessive broadcaster goes to the cupboard containing every tape off all his shows, probably numbering a few hundred. To his distress number 276 is missing and his completist nature forces him to appeal to his listeners. "Does anyone have a copy of this particular show they can let me have?" He gets a reply and sets off to meet the man with the tape he requires. Imagine his surprise when the guy's appartment turns out to be a veritable shrine to Dr. Frasier Crane. Just a thought !

Finally, whilst on this subject, I have let it be known on more than one occasion that I am wont to drive around all day listening to tapes, a few of which are CG shows from different eras, and from a small random stock I have my favourites, two in particular from a few years ago when Charlie was sitting in for Bob Harris on Radio 2.....very relaxed, and "The Best of Honky Tonk '75" which with it's wonderfully distant AM reception and weird rockabilly sounds to me much more foreign than what we are attuned to today.

PostPosted: Tue Aug 01, 2006 8:20 pm
by howard male
What a delightful post, Will. That Frazier episode has crossed my mind once or twice over the past few years too, when I used to take a stack of tapes back to my brother in law, Steve, in Cambridge (pre broadband) - he probably has a pretty complete set (2001-2004) up in his attic.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2006 10:08 am
by Charlie
will vine wrote:I am reminded of an episode of Frasier where the obsessive broadcaster goes to the cupboard containing every tape off all his shows, probably numbering a few hundred. To his distress number 276 is missing and his completist nature forces him to appeal to his listeners. "Does anyone have a copy of this particular show they can let me have?" He gets a reply and sets off to meet the man with the tape he requires. Imagine his surprise when the guy's apartment turns out to be a veritable shrine to Dr. Frasier Crane.

Stop me if you've heard this one before.

Back in the Honky Tonk days, a listener called Ron Ray used to tape the show on a reel-to-reel machine, and I also made a safety copy of most of them. At some stage I ran out of shelf space and he drove over to pick up my entire archive to fill the gaps in his own.

A couple of years ago, Ron's wife called with the sad news that Ron had died, leaving her to sort out all his stuff, which included a bedroom full of cardboad boxes labelled Honky Tonk Tapes. So this time it was me who made the car journey, in the company of Andy Linehan from the National Sound Archive, where the tapes are now stored.

But the indexing is not very complete. I think we have managed to identify those featuring guests or themes, but in those days before computers, the playlists were hand-written and even I have trouble deciphering some of the changed details. It would take somebody with the time anbd pateince to listen to them and double check what actually occurred.

One of the odder programmes featured interviews with Debbie Harry and Lester Bangs on the same show. In those days long before Radio Ping Pong, I followed the usual convention of inviting the guest to bring records with them, but did not take turns to play my own choices.

Unfortunately the recording missed the start of the show - we don't hear the spoken introduction and it begins midway through a recording of Australian Aboriginal chanting that Debbie had chosen as her first record. After a few minutes it dawned on me that if I didn't fade it out, she would have happily sat there for the entire side of the album, which would have spared her the effort of having to speak. In the event she was fairly monosyllabic, and what should have been a coup was more of a damp squib. Camiile, she was not. [Aha, you are wondering, is this why I was so slow in adding Blondie to 'The Canon' in 'Howard's World Views'?] Lester was much more forthcoming and entertaining.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 02, 2006 12:29 pm
by johnfoyle
Is the Honky Tonk show from August 15 1976 archived? Coming up on it's 30th anniversery , it's of particular interest to a rabid Elvis Costello fan like me . According to Will Birch's No Sleep To Canvey Island it was in this show that Elvis' early demos first got played . I know you told E.C. biographer Graeme Thomsom ( 'Complicated Shadows ', Canongate , 2004) a lot about it a few years ago ; maybe you might like to share some thoughts here to mark the occasion.

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 1:00 pm
by gordonfmoore
Guess we have to be kinda careful about "recorded shows" and helping others out - copyright and all that. Probably best to private mail. I guess Charlie's voice is sans copyright (he he).

I'm afraid I don't keep the old shows, it was the new fix I needed.

[Btw for the benefit of others could I refer you to a product called Total Recorder (google it). Many might find it invaluable for "taping/recording". ! :)]

Regards

Gordon

PostPosted: Thu Aug 03, 2006 7:51 pm
by Alan Balfour
Charlie wrote:One of the odder programmes featured interviews with Debbie Harry and Lester Bangs
In Richard Wooton's second edition of Honky Tonkin' (undated but £2.50) on p. 175 there's a photo taken by Andra Nelki of CG interviewing DH in the studio. In the background I recognise a chap named Charlie McKissak (sp) who has next to him a person who may well be Bangs.