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2006 - July 22 - Gerry Lyseight & Pete Lawrence (Big Chi

PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 3:59 pm
by Charlie
I first came across last Saturday’s guest, Pete Lawence, in the late 80s when he worked at Cooking Vinyl with the likes of Michelle Shocked. He then went on to set up The Big Chill with Katrina Larkin in the small back room of the Union Chapel. The Big Chill now lends its name to: a very successful bar in Brick Lane; a record label; the 30,000 capacity annual weekend festival at Eastnor Castle (August 4-6); the soon to be opened Big Chill House in King’s Cross; and Pete’s musical selections reflected aspects of that journey.

Over the years it appears that The Big Chill has become the rallying point where folk meets electronica, dub, jazz and all things ambient although there’s still room for the likes of Norman Jay to rock the festival on an annual basis.

Pete has also compiled a collection of English folk music with Alan James called Garden of Delights which I’ve been playing over the last couple of weeks with more comps in the works and his own solo project aptly entitled “Chilled By Natureâ€

PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 8:26 pm
by howard male
I'd just like to say Cybernaut by Tonto's Expanding Headband was one of the worse pieces of music I've ever heard broadcast anywhere at any time! I could hardly believe it when two otherwise fairly sensible seeming gentlemen (Gerry and Pete) said what a joy it was to hear again when it eventually finished - talk about seeing (or in this case, hearing) the past through rose tinted glasses (or in this case, velvet lined headphones).

It just sounded like someone messing about rather ineptly on a vintage synth. Surely Tonto blah blah blah, are one of the greatest examples of 'emperor's new clothes' in the entire history of popular music?

I suspect their original success had more to do with the fact they had stumbled upon a bunch of groovy new sounds, rather than them having any actual musical ability. If anything illustrates the genius of Stevie Wonder it is that he then actually did something of substance with those sounds, as Superstition - one of the greatest singles of all time - demonstrates.

PostPosted: Tue Jul 25, 2006 10:13 pm
by NormanD
There was some far worse music than Tonto's that came out in the early-70's, Howard. A lot of it seems to have been overly-praised around here in recent weeks. Maybe the curse of rose-tinted headphones is spreading.

Superstition is a great record. It's the guitar riff of Jeff Beck that made it into the classic that it is.

The Alice Coltrane tune was superb, thank you Gerry for playing it. It sounded like blues licks being squeezed out of a Rolf Harris Stylophone. More please.

Kemo sabe.

norman

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 9:26 am
by howard male
Norman wrote -

There was some far worse music than Tonto's that came out in the early-70's, Howard. A lot of it seems to have been overly-praised around here in recent weeks.


I don't think so, Norman. The above statement is a subjective one. My statement about the Tonto track is completely objective: the keyboard player seems to be trying to pick out a bass riff with his left hand and play rudimentary ascending melodies with his right, and it really just sounds like someone who's just got their first electronic keyboard out of its box and is having a doodle - quite astonishingly naive, pointless, and constantly going out of time - or as Marcia put it, 'like the soundtrack to some naff early seventies sci-fi TV series'.

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 2:25 pm
by NormanD
howard male wrote:...the keyboard player seems to be trying to pick out a bass riff with his left hand and play rudimentary ascending melodies with his right, and it really just sounds like someone who's just got their first electronic keyboard out of its box and is having a doodle - quite astonishingly naive, pointless, and constantly going out of time - or as Marcia put it, 'like the soundtrack to some naff early seventies sci-fi TV series'.
Sounds like the Alice Cotrane track, which I praised (hence my Rolf Harris reference). So, my subjective is your objective, and vice versa. The Coltrane track was played just after Tonto, I can't remember if there was any talk in between. So, maybe what you thought was Tonto was actually Ms Coltrane. Obviously, still no good in your book but great in mine.

I don't think we're gonna get much further with this one. It's too hot to listen again all the way through to pursue it. Maybe Gerry can enlighten it.

Anyway, I liked it/them greatly. And your critical words explain why.

Each to their own tastes.....

Norman

PostPosted: Wed Jul 26, 2006 4:26 pm
by howard male
Norman wrote -

Sounds like the Alice Cotrane track. . .


No, it was the Tonto track. The Alice Coltrane track, while not being exactly my thing, at least demonstated a sophisticated musical sensibility at work, and was actually quite stirring in a way.

And one last comment on this show - has anyone ever plugged something quite as much as Pete Lawrence plugged the B** C*** (didn't want to give it any more free publicity) during a two hour radio show? I'm sure he must have said those two words more times than the word motherf***** appears in a Tarantino movie.