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Re: Food

PostPosted: Tue Apr 30, 2013 9:13 pm
by Ronald
Janet M wrote:I continued my quest to eat my way around the world in Glasgow, last


If you see a place where they sell food from The Netherlands, run away.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 7:56 am
by Ronald
About 10 years ago a student from Malaysia who worked in the hotel we were staying in in Bayswater told us about a place near Marble Arch were one could eat Malay food which was not expensive. We could not find it then but this time we found it by accident, it was in a street not far from our hotel, it must have moved because it was not near Marble Arch. It was situated in a basement but when we wanted to enter we saw a sign in the window that said that only Malays were allowed to enter unless the person was accompanied by a Malay. As we stood there not knowing what to do an elderly Englishmen went down the stairs and said that they had good food. When we told him about the sign he said that anyone could enter but that the sign was meant for when they do their prayers on Friday. It was not as big as we expected (a hall) but the food was good and cheap (10.40 for two meals and two drinks). We were there about 18.30 and about 12 people were eating there (all Malays). Only later we realised that if it had indeed been for only Malays we need not have worried because my wife is from Indonesia and several people smiled at her or nodded their head.

Here links to two blogs which have more about The Malaysian Hall Canteen with pictures.


http://peachesanddonuts.blogspot.nl/201 ... ondon.html

http://bellaphon.blogspot.nl/2008/11/ma ... nteen.html

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 4:27 pm
by AndyM
Ronald wrote:
If you see a place where they sell food from The Netherlands, run away.


Not the thing to read when you're shortly off to Holland for a week..........

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 5:08 pm
by Adam Blake
Mayonnaise and chips is fun the first couple of hundred times.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 5:44 pm
by AndyM
Adam Blake wrote:Mayonnaise and chips is fun the first couple of hundred times.


We must be up to about 187!

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 7:04 pm
by Adam Blake
Well there's always the pickled herring and onion roll.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 7:47 pm
by Ronald
Andy, Dutch food is nothing special, usually boiled pototoes with vegetables and a piece of meat. My mother was fond of stews with red cabbage, sauerkraut, cauliflower etc. Ever since I was a boy I disliked it intensely, I remember often standing in a dark attic, it being winter and cold and dark outside, fogged windows and above all the horrible smell of all those boiled cabbages which even reached the attic to which I had escaped. I don't think you will find a Dutch dish in an international cookbook.

But don't despair, everywhere in the Netherlands there are Italian, Chinese, Indonesian etc restaurants, or you may try Surinam food, my favourite is rice with pom. Or as Adam wrote, chips with mayonaise. I was amazed when visiting London in 1971 that one could not get chips with mayonaise, it was beyond me.

As a child every so often we were given a treat by our parents which meant that we were given a large bag of chips with delicious creamy mayonnaise, bought from a snackbar or from a market stall, everyone in Holland knows chips with mayonnaise is delicious. Later other sauces became popular like hot spicy Indonesian sate sauce (peanut butter sauce), this began in the early 1960's, again later a mixture of several sauces became popular, I shall show some. A snackbar in Holland is a place were you can buy chips, meatballs, croquettes, grilled chicken, ice-cream etc.


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People queuing at a market stall to buy chips

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The famous bag of chips with mayonnaise

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Chips with spicy satay sauce

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Patat oorlog (chips war), chips with mayonnaise, satay sauce and onions

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Patat speciaal (chips special), chips with mayonnaise, ketchup/curry ketchup and onions

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Patat kapsalon (chips hair salon). This was invented in 2003 by a guy from the Cape Verdes who was a hairdresser, he always ordered chips with the things he liked with it. It are chips, on top of that Shawarma meat, then cheese, this is put under a grill and finished with fresh lettuce on top

Tomorrow I shall post some more Dutch "delicacies" one can get in a snackbar.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 10:22 pm
by Hugh Weldon
After those pics I just need to see some wafels now.

Do you remember those vending machines on Dutch railway stations that sold hot snacks. Can't remember what was in them now. Pies? Maybe wafels??

Re: Food

PostPosted: Thu May 02, 2013 10:45 pm
by AndyM
Last time I used one of those machines I had a chicken croquette, Hugh. Well, when I say 'chicken'......

Thanks for the tips and the pics, Ronald! Actually I have been to restaurants in Amsterdam which give a sort of postmodern haute-cuisine twist to traditional Dutch food; one called Greetje's which was genuinely excellent.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 1:30 pm
by Ronald
Andy, I had a look at Greetje's menu but I don't recognise any of their dishes, it certainly is not what my mother or grandmothers used to cook.

Huygh, you won't find any vending machines anymore on the stations, i'll show some pics of the snacks that were in them and what you can get in snackbars.


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One of the many snackbars you will find in the Netherlands

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What's on offer

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Kroket (Croquette) usually eaten with mustard, some people prefer it on a roll

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Nasibal (fried rice, pieces of meat and vegetables)

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Bamihapje (fried mee with pieces of meat and vegetables) this and the Nasibal are usually eaten with sambal (Indonesian red pepper sauce)

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Frikadel (flavoured minced meat) some people eat it with mustard but frikadel speciaal with mayonnaise, ketchup and onions has become more popular

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Meatball, like the above but a lot of people prefer it with satay sauce, my favourite is a sliced meat ball with satay sauce on a roll

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In every snackbar you can buy satay which originated in Indonesia/Malaysia

Re: Food

PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 4:15 pm
by uiwangmike
I saw a Dutch documentary today called L'Amour des Moules (which seems to be the original title - perhaps it sounds better in French). The people in the film seemed pretty passionate about the eponymous bivalves, particularly Dutch ones, which are claimed to be far superior to their immediate southern neighbours.
Anyway, if you always wanted to know all about mussels but were afraid to ask, it's highly recommended.
http://www.musselsinlove.com/

Re: Food

PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 8:12 pm
by NormanD
I've recently discovered the joys of sumac - not Yma, but the powdered spice. I've only tried it on chicken, so far, and it's a winner. Mixed with oil, garlic, a splash of lemon juice, pasted on the meat and then baked. So far, I've just had a large packet from the local Turkish food store - I haven't scored any berries or used the powder on other foods.

Any suggestions?

Re: Food

PostPosted: Fri May 03, 2013 8:16 pm
by AndyM
Sumac is great on yoghurty potato salads.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Mon May 06, 2013 2:37 pm
by kas
You've come this far about Dutch food with nobody mentioning pannekoeken??
The savoury varieties are my favourite kind of a Dutch treat, aside the malay rijstafel. And I've had a few, my father in law is Dutch and we have visited Holland quite a few times. I have also enjoyed hutspot though. Some of Dutch food remind me of typical Finnish food - boiled or mashed potatoes, minced meat, lots of dairy products, cabbage...

I can feel my heart cloaking up by just looking at the pictures of those croquettes... But yes, chips with mayonnaise is delicious.

Re: Food

PostPosted: Tue May 07, 2013 8:43 am
by Ronald
Did you try the small pancakes called Poffertjes? I actually prefer them over pancakes, especially with a bit of butter and a lot of icing sugar.

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