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Unusual pairings (on record)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 4:53 pm
by Charlie
Alan Balfour wrote:
NormanD wrote:Are there any other pairings as different as this that we know of? I can think of Louis Armstrong playing with Jimmie Rodgers, but not much else.
Jimmie Rodgers and prewar bluesman Clifford Gibson. Check it out at Stefan's Gibson page http://www.wirz.de/music/jamelmfrm.htm.

This looks like too good a chance to pass up, as I move this item from its relative obscurity under 'Looking for an Echo' to greater prominence here

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 5:29 pm
by NormanD
For the sake of completion, the earlier post was
Rob Hall & I had some recent email correspondence about Elmore James's contribution to a couple of Big Joe Turner songs. From what (Alan B) since told me, they were effectively cut as a "gimmick". Some gimmick!

Are there any other pairings as different as this that we know of? I can think of Louis Armstrong playing with Jimmie Rodgers, but not much else.
The Elmore/Big Joe song was "TV Mama".

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 6:20 pm
by Hugh Weldon
Two unlikely pairings I recall which nevertheless produced pretty good pop records were Cliff Richard and Van Morrison (was it called 'When God Shines His Light' or something?) and Barbra Streisand and Donna Summer doing 'Enough is Enough'.

David Bowie and Bing Crosby were another odd pair, but in that case I don't think the results were quite as good.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 9:52 pm
by Rob Hall
Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder and Nusrat Ali Fateh Khan teaming up on the "Dead Man Walking" soundtrack always struck me as an unlikely combination, but the results weren't as bad as I feared.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 24, 2008 11:35 pm
by Dayna
Martina McBride and Elvis singing on a Christmas album together.

Bono & Frank Sinatra- i've Got You Under My Skin

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 10:18 am
by Charlie
Rob Hall wrote:Pearl Jam's Eddie Vedder and Nusrat Ali Fateh Khan teaming up on the "Dead Man Walking" soundtrack always struck me as an unlikely combination, but the results weren't as bad as I feared.

Yeah, that would win the prize, especially if we include an aesthetic approval factor in our discussions

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 5:53 pm
by mike gavin
Always thought the pairing of the winsome, bucolic Nick Drake with free jazz fire brand South African pianist Chris McGregor was fairly unlikely (Bryter Later - the connection being Joe Boyd, of course). And the album also featured Doris Troy and PP Arnold.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 6:35 pm
by NormanD
Another recent one was Joe Henry, on his album "Scar", which has Ornette Coleman on a couple of tracks. How this came about, I've no idea (though money is the obvious answer). I suspect that Ornette's contributions may have been phoned in. But the album does feature other top jazz players: Me’shell Ndegeocello, Brad Mehldau, Brian Blade, and Marc Ribot. Damned shame that the songs weren't better.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 7:43 pm
by judith
Roy Clark and Joe Pass playing Hank Williams songs. Seemed unusual at the time. Recently Wynton Marsalis and Willie Nelson made an album together, but that isn't really that odd, considering recent recording events, I suspect we will be seeing more big name 'crossover' pairings. What I am curious about is who will be purchasing the record - Marsalis or Nelson fans? I did find a video (sorry, not a recording) of Leonard Cohen with Sonny Rollins and one of Bing Crosby with David Bowie (now that was really odd at the time, less so now). I'll post them on the YouTube thread.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 25, 2008 11:31 pm
by Rob Hall
The incredible Leonard Cohen/Sonny Rollins clip that Judith unearthed reminded me that Was (Not Was) are past masters in the art of unusual pairings: their album "Born to Laugh At Tornados" featured contributions from Ozzy Osbourne and Mel Torme.

Others:

Joni Mitchell's "Mingus", which features sound bites of the man.

William Shatner and Ben Folds, who worked together to produce Shatner's "Has Been" album, roping in Joe Jackson on the excellent cover of Pulp's "Common People". (The video seems to have been pulled from YouTube.)

Sting had a walk-on talking part on Miles Davis' "You're Under Arrest".

Also, I read today that Johnny Hartman had to be talked into recording the album that he did with Coltrane. Apparently, he didn't consider himself a jazz singer and he initially thought that their styles would not be complementary.

PostPosted: Tue Dec 02, 2008 1:27 pm
by John Crosby
judith wrote:Roy Clark and Joe Pass playing Hank Williams songs. Seemed unusual at the time.


Roy was quite an adventurous country music player. He made a thundering big band Rhythm & Blues album ' Makin' Music' in the late '70s with Clarence 'Gatemouth' Brown for MCA). I still have a mint vinyl copy but have just noticed that the CD version, which was around briefly in the early '90s is fetching up to $233 at amazon.com (there are 6 copies there starting out from $100 upwards). It's that kind of music.