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PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 3:29 pm
by Charlie
Leon Parker wrote: Care was a great source as I lived with West Indian kids who had Reggae and hippy staff who took us to see progressive rock gigs and brought us L.P.’s for presents.

When I first came to London, I taught at Kinsgway College and received the best education a young man could hope for, from the boys who brought in the latest reggae singles, while never appreciating what the other boys liked about Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd.

I was never a hippy but did take a class to The Roundhouse, where some took acid, but that's a story I'll tell you another time.

Great thread, Garth

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 5:45 pm
by MurkeyChris
No children planned anytime soon I can assure you, if ever, but I am indebted to my parents for a lot of my music tastes. After discovering it was usually cheaper to take us to a concert at Bridgwater Arts Centre rather than pay a babysitter we were lucky enough to grow up seeing a huge variety of live music. Show of Hands and the Albion Band were the two I remember seeing loads of, but also have memories of Edward II, Oysterband, Barley Works, Chris While and Julie Matthews, Big Gig, Chris Wood and Andy Cutting, Kieran Goss, Mary Black and even Eliza Carthy and Saul Rose around the time of Red Rice (I wasn't a massive fan at the time). They were never proper 'folkies', being more into the mainstream end of it - lots of CDs by Richard Thompson, Sandy Denny, John Martyn, Joni Mitchell and Paul Brady but Martin Carthy was a 'bit traditional'. World music was a less obvious influence, but I've just recalled a gig by Chilean group Quimantu (thanks to the Show of Hands connection), plus Peter Gabriel's albums and Graceland were big household favourites.

It wasn't all folky - we all enjoyed a bit of Fleetwood Mac and Camel for example, but I tended to assume anything that wasn't Top 40 at the time was folk! I think living out in the country helped the family's less mainstream tastes thrive - it was a trip to Bristol if we wanted to see someone really famous and it was quite astonishing when I first realised that it was possible to see people off the tele in concert! I'm ashamed to say I was always embarrassed of my wierd taste in music and it wasn't until college that I started to realise it was quite a cool thing to have different taste and not like the mainstream (although around that time, just to be contrary, I finally found that there was actually some great stuff in the charts).

It slightly upsets me now to find that in their fifties Mum and Dad's tastes are blanding out a bit. It's all about girls with nice voices now - recent favourites have been Kirsty McGee and Karine Polwart and my Dad even expressed a liking for Katie Melua! His last real attempt to get into mainstream music was on the Millennium when they had one of these polls counting down the Albums of the Millennium. Radiohead had two in the Top 5 so he asked for The Bends for Christmas. I'm not sure he ever listened to it, but I loved it!

Chris

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 12:19 am
by Dayna
I don't have any kids yet, but I learned to love all different types of music from my parents who had records from 60s. It's what my Mom listened to when she was home from work, & I borrowed them a lot. My grandmother gave us hundreds of 45s, mostly from 50s & 60s. One we had was Pepperment Twist, but they mostly disapeared somewhere. Then in highschool Classic Rock & the 80s were popular, so I heard that a lot. I sort of just came home & put on whatever I was in the mood for, though, just like I do now, with all the varieties I love. My Dad always liked Country music though, but my Mom made fun of him a lot for that. I just never learned to like it myself.

I can remember when staying with my Grandparents, my Grandfather had on Big Band a lot when he was getting ready for work & I learned to like that too.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:36 am
by kas
Our kid is still in that age (9 years) when he can freely be as passionate about the metal monster band Lordi (parental supervision excercised, yes), Eurovision pop, some classical and children's songs. He doesn't even mind us playing some jazz, reggae etc.
Blessed age...

I got into the habit of plundering my dad's record collection in my late teens when I was beginning to appreciate the jazz, Brel and other stuff in there. There wasn't a lot of records and my parents weren't cool enough to have rock'n'roll, blues or such though. But some of the jazz was a revelation: some Django Reinhardt, and two EP collections with Kansas City Six, Omer Simeon Trio and a few other choice selections.

Once I even discovered a couple of my uncle's old Beatles singles in our attic - in appaling shape, but perfectly playable once I cleaned them (and they were some of their early, rock/pop hits too, which was terrific).

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 10:24 am
by garth cartwright
OK, we watched X Factor last night as the kids spent the weekend with their dad and we were at Sharon Shannon on Sat'. All of us happy Daniel has been voted off (finally) tho as Howard noted Rachel could of gone due to her abysmal reading of One (I remember Howard and Charlie saying how much they liked Mary J's version of that awful song - NO! NO!).

I checked what else they liked right now and Arianne said High School Musical and Grease (she's 9) and Alex said techno which is from tektonic - this bizarre French craze where groups of youths do rock'n'roll style formation dances to techno. He goes on you-tube to check the dances and we do what all parents do ie scream "turn that rubbish down!" Arianne can sing You're The One That I Want pretty well. I recall Grease being huge when I was at school so remember most of the words.

Whether they ever come around to what we play them isn't important - they find a lot of joy in what they like and we take pleasure in that.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 10:27 am
by garth cartwright
PS on the way to Sharon Shannon - at the Borderline - we walked past the Astoria which was surrounded by punks with giant mohawks and such. Who were playing? Rancid. If i was 14 again I would so have wanted to be there! How were they Rob? What was your daughter's opinion? Show was completely sold out and touts begging for tickets so for a bunch of old punk lags they have a very loyal - and young - following. Sharon Shannon played well to a crowded room of middleaged Irish blokes, most of whom have obviously been in love with her for decades!

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 6:15 pm
by Rob Hall
garth cartwright wrote:PS on the way to Sharon Shannon - at the Borderline - we walked past the Astoria which was surrounded by punks with giant mohawks and such. Who were playing? Rancid. If i was 14 again I would so have wanted to be there! How were they Rob? What was your daughter's opinion? Show was completely sold out and touts begging for tickets so for a bunch of old punk lags they have a very loyal - and young - following. Sharon Shannon played well to a crowded room of middleaged Irish blokes, most of whom have obviously been in love with her for decades!

To be honest Garth, I think it was more of a social than anything else. I got a text some time after midnight to say that she'd met up with some friends at Waterloo and would be hanging out with them for a while and, oh, by the way, can Esther stay over in the spare bed and can Josh have the sofa? I think they got back some time around 2am.