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has this site turned into Mojo/Uncut?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 11:49 am
by Nigel w
As I write the top four subjects in this fourm are

AC/DC (flowing into Led Zeppelin)

David Bowie

The Clash

The Doors.

WHAT HAPPENED TO WORLD MUSIC ????

Re: has this site turned into Mojo/Uncut?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:10 pm
by Nick Boyes
Nigel w wrote:
WHAT HAPPENED TO WORLD MUSIC ????


Maybe it has just gone too acoustic and safe for the old rock and rollers in town.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:19 pm
by howard male
Mr Williamson boomed -

WHAT HAPPENED TO WORLD MUSIC ????


Sorry, Sir. We'll all get back to our desks right away. I had meant to submit a 2000-word essay on the fab series of 70's African CDs being put out by Oriki. But then I saw the words David Bowie and went into a retro-trance. It won't happen again, Sir.

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:23 pm
by Nigel w
Maybe it has just gone too acoustic and safe for the old rock and rollers in town.


In which case try Buraka Som Sistema...

And Howard - that 2,000 word essay on my desk by lunchtime, eh? Otherwise it's Saturday morning detention for you, my boy...

Re: has this site turned into Mojo/Uncut?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:23 pm
by Ted
Nigel w wrote: The Clash


I was actually listening to an old Chaba Zahounia tape when I read the words "The Clash". The red mist descended and well i just don't remember what happened for the next few minutes..

Re: has this site turned into Mojo/Uncut?

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 12:43 pm
by Charlie
Ted wrote:I was actually listening to an old Chaba Zahounia tape when I read the words "The Clash". The red mist descended and well i just don't remember what happened for the next few minutes..

Probably triggered by e reminder in a retro thread here, I've been listening again to N'Sel Fik, what a groove, what a track, vocally, melodically, in fact in every way

And in response to Nigel's valid question, perhaps a discussion could be sparked by the recent Songlines initiative to launch a new Awards for World Music event at WOMAD next year. I will find and post the relevant email in a moment

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:46 pm
by Nick Boyes
Thank you Nigel I will check out Buraka Som Sistema.

It was just my most recent buys Seprewa Kasa and Amadou Sodia are very pleasant nice music but not very exciting.

I much preferred the Samba Mapangala and Brenda Fassie re-issues

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 1:47 pm
by joel
My response has been to order 20 - count 'em - new(ish) Ocora and Prophet releases. Of no interest to the hipster rockin' fusionistas on here, but enough oxygen to keep me going :-)

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2008 2:01 pm
by howard male
Nigel W wrote -

In which case try Buraka Som Sistema...


or Moussa Doumbia.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 8:40 am
by kas
A valid question...
Maybe mentioning The Clash has worked a bit like opening a Pandora's Box of past (rock) sins...
You mention Joe Strummer and out comes Angus Young...

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 3:19 pm
by Dayna
I'm happy Robert Plant got to come out of the box for a little bit, at least. I thought maybe The Who would too, but it didn't work.
The other day, I turned my CD player on & just let it start where it wanted to & it landed on Pirates Choice. So I got back into that for a bit too. So, I'm happy to discuss all of it, what I know anyway.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 4:36 pm
by c hristian
i forgot to tell Dayna that rest assured, the Honey Drippers cd holds a valued spot in my cd case. I play sea of love, and from the other robert plant cd right next to it, Big Log every so often to hear some Plant beauty, and to take ....me....back.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 5:38 pm
by garth cartwright
A general query here: why does rock music from the 60s/70s continue to hold such strong appeal? AC/DC are the biggest selling act of recent years, the Zep reformation concert last year was the hottest ticket ever, Dylan and Stones and co keep filling stadiums etc etc. Uncut/Mojo are set up to cater to these tastes - and their readers are not just wrinklies - while in the US Classic Rock stations abound (with extremely conservative playlists - Zep, ZZ Top, the Cars being the acts i heard the most when listening in). The Pistols and the Clash are now classic rock (even if not on those US stations) and popular with teens internationally - when I travel I find grafitti for AC/DC, Zep, Motorhead, Iron Maiden etc everywhere, even in places like Guatemala and the Ukraine. Deep Purple remains giants in East Europe. Elvis and his contemporaries don't appear to match this demand - I realise Prez is still a big earner tho - and jazz/blues/soul/country etc from the 60s-70s doesn't get the same kind of massive demand. So what is it about the 64-84 rock scene that generates such interest and income? Yr thoughts please.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:06 pm
by Dayna
Here in the Cleveland area, our Classic Rock station plays, Led Zeppelin, ACDC, Rush, Yes, Rolling Stones, ZZ Top, Ted Nugent, ELO, Lynard Skynyrd, & all the other Classic bands. Cleveland's always been very well known for being a Rock town!


The Clash & The Cars are usually on stations that play 80s for some reason.

They play Elvis on the Oldies stations.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 03, 2008 6:08 pm
by howard male
Garth asked -

A general query here: why does rock music from the 60s/70s continue to hold such strong appeal?


My theory, which I've voiced on the forum before, is that rock music (or perhaps we should expand the label to include reggae, hip-hop, and all the pop forms that blossomed or exploded into life in the second half of the Twentieth Century) will be the dominant musical language for at least another century or two, just as classical music dominated western culture for centuries.

I used to get quite distressed by how Western popular music has stood stock still, and just looked back for decades, until this theory dawned on me. Then I was able to just shrug my shoulders and stop hoping for any new Western pop to come along and shake me awake again.

There have always been periods of invention followed by much longer periods of stasis in all the arts, so just because our experience as 40 Somethings, 50 Somethings, and 60 Somethings has been of constant developments, digressions and refinements, that clearly wasn't going to go on forever.

So we just have to be thankful that we all grew up when these musical styles were being born, and feel pity for all those poor, young kids who are stuck listening to some 2D, sterile carbon copy of the bands we loved, until it dawns on them to start raiding their parent's or grandparent's record collections.