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PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:20 pm
by Adam Blake
Jonathan E. wrote:We're not all uptight about Bozo's apparently homosexuality, are we? We're not discriminating against gays in this forum now, I hope.


No problem with homosexuality. Nine virtually identical cretinous, self-serving posts on nine separate threads I do have a problem with, however.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:22 pm
by That Was Jonathan E. Then
Adam Blake wrote:
Jonathan E. wrote:We're not all uptight about Bozo's apparently homosexuality, are we? We're not discriminating against gays in this forum now, I hope.


No problem with homosexuality. Nine virtually identical cretinous, self-serving posts on nine separate threads I do have a problem with, however.

Well, then, who is Bozo Bingtrousers and who is the self these nine posts are serving?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:23 pm
by Des

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:30 pm
by Des
....so that's a no then. I like em though.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:32 pm
by Dayna
This is all so upsetting. I thought we were over all this & things were getting back to normal again.
All this was dealt with before. There were aplologies made ect. Why is everything being drug out again!?

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 8:34 pm
by Des
Dayna wrote:This is all so upsetting. I thought we were over all this & things were getting back to normal again.
All this was dealt with before. There were aplologies made ect. Why is everything being drug out again!?


It's all right Dayna. It's a bloke thing. Peace.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:37 pm
by That Was Jonathan E. Then
Des wrote:Foals, anyone?

http://www.myspace.com/foals

To change the subject from baby horses to baby deer, we have a fawn outside the window on the lawn right now eating the grass. It's still a little fuzzy although quite large already. I'd guess a couple of months old. The mother deer is keeping watch but doing her share of grass eating too. I'm happy for them to eat the grass, wish they'd eat it all so I need never drag out the lawnmower — but if they eat my lilies again I will be irritated! It's really quite cute (I have been in America too long!) having the animal kingdom come to your door.

The hummingbirds are surviving even though we've been having snow, which is most unusual this late in the year. Lots of flickers have been around lately and the big pileated woodpeckers have made their rounds and pecked the hell out of a few trees. There have been plenty of mourning doves in their quiet self-possessed pairs. I can hear them cooing as I write. They're perhaps my favourite bird because they are so calm. I'm never sure how they manage to survive, but they are in fact pretty quick to take off when disturbed. Still a hawk or an owl got one a few weeks ago, leaving only a few feathers by the bird feeder. The past few mornings, we've been able to lie in bed, looking through the window, and see a pair of mourning doves on a branch of the big Douglas fir beside the house.

Yesterday, on the north end of the island by a lagoon, I saw two bald eagles sitting on fenceposts which is an usual place for them to sit, just about 4 feet above the ground. One was an adult and the other a juvenile, perhaps two years old. After awhile the adult flew off, circling over the lagoon. I could follow it with the naked eye, even with snow around — I couldn't see its white head, of course, but its dark body stood out well, to a tree about a mile away. Then the juvenile flew about 50 or 60 feet to a taller post, about 20 feet high, and landed on it and just stayed there, ruffling its feathers and flexing its wings. It was perhaps 60 feet away from me.

On Wednesday, I saw an osprey flying quite close over head. At first, I thought it might be a young eagle but then the white patches became quite distinctive. There were a few eagles around further down the beach — but they were being real lazy, just soaring, although I did hear some of the surprisingly pathetic little calls that they make.

The deer are now moving off into the woods, doing that slow motion thing they do as they pick their way through the underbrush. Unfortunately dangerously close to my newly planted Sequoias — they'd better not develop a taste for those! Now they're off behind the woodshed that I built last year and that has saved our lives this winter, and out of sight. But probably still eating something.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 9:50 pm
by That Was Jonathan E. Then
Now there's a big pileated having a go at the very old and very dead and very riddled tree trunk that we call the Squirrel Condo. A very handsome redhead with a massive beak. I could hear him pecking away from inside. Hope he leaves some trunk for the squirrels to live in later this summer.

Image
This is about how he looks, but is not the actual bird outside my window. The tree is a lot deader than the one in the photo.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:20 pm
by judith
We have a pileated much like the one in your picture (or descendants thereof) who for the 20 years I've been in this house at least, spends 2 or 3 days every April hanging out in and pecking away at an old holly tree outside my window. Then he flies a little ways up the street and has a go at the telephone pole. I love to sit and listen for repetition, rhythms, in the tat-tat-tats he makes.

For almost as many years, we've had a flock (at least 30) tiny copper colored humingbirds come through and spend about a week buzzing around in the cherry tree in my back garden - always when the blossoms are in full bloom. This year, they arrived earlier and stayed in the prickly Darwin Barberry amongst the flowers, built nests, and had babies, and territorial battles (sword fights with their beaks) with the ruby crested (not their proper name) hummingbirds that winter over. The copper's babies are the tiniest little things, not much bigger than a moth and constantly flying about. After about three weeks from their arrival, one morning they were gone.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:35 pm
by Spartacus
The tree is a lot deader


a lot deader? A LOT DEADER?

My boy it should be written:

more deader

doesn't no-one get learned superlative theory anynow?

Regards
Prof Spare Spart, educashionalisp to the wurld.

PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 10:53 pm
by That Was Jonathan E. Then
Spartacus wrote:
The tree is a lot deader


a lot deader? A LOT DEADER?

My boy it should be written:

more deader

doesn't no-one get learned superlative theory anynow?

Regards
Prof Spare Spart, educashionalisp to the wurld.


I think I squirted some juice through my valves like a clam.

Now I look at the tree in the photo more closely, a lot more closer, I see it appears to have a nail driven into it. In fact, possibly that pileated is nailed to the tree, which would ,make it a lot deader pileated than it at first appears. But, otoh, there is no real evidence in the photo that the tree is in any way dead. It might be quite alive. Therefore, I was indeed incorrect when I said that our tree is a lot deader, because our tree is just dead, absolutely just dead, but a long time ago, I mean it is a very dead tree, it is a lot deader than many other trees but whether it is more deader than the tree in the photo is impossible to ascertain because as I said we have no evidence that the tree in the photo is in any way dead. You can't really compare the deadness of a live tree with the deadness of a dead tree because there is no deadness in the live tree with which to make a comparison.

Thank you for pointing this error of mine out, Spartacus. I understand that you are a man who knows a thing or two about dead trees seeing as how you are nailed to one yourself, or at least part of one, somewhat like that poor pileated in the photo might possibly be, leaving aside all questions of the potential deadness of that particular tree, although I feel it necessary to point out that all trees are potentially dead — as are we.

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:16 am
by Spartacus
When is a tree dead? When it's a door!

(er, no, that's not the joke, no, wasn't it something to do with a jar? no, doesn't sound right, mumble, mutter, mmmm, )

Re: Spotty white kids with guitars

PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2008 9:17 am
by Spartacus
Des wrote:Is there any future for 'indie' music?


What were we talking about?