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Will The Cyprus Crisis Trigger a Revolution?

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 9:28 am
by Adam Blake
Why should Facebook have all the fun? I remember some very interesting political debates on SoTW. What do you reckon, people?

http://dangerousminds.net/comments/capi ... revolution

Re: Will The Cyprus Crisis Trigger a Revolution?

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:11 am
by NormanD
In answer to the original question the article poses: No.

The article doesn't actually address what it means by "revolution", or from whom. It's descriptive and condemnatory, and rightly so, but it doesn't seem to draw on the reactions of the people of, say, Greece or Ireland - to compare or gauge how they've acted, their acceptance or resistance.

The proposed theft from Cypriots' bank accounts is outrageous, and a serious precedent for other nations. It's being scaled down, but the theft will likely take another form. Greece came up with the novel idea of Peoples' Theft To Pay The Bankers being levied via increased utility charges. No doubt, Cyprus will think of some more imaginative form of torture to extract this community punishment.

The Euro monetary crisis will possibly trigger more banking instability, social hardships, and political insecurity (by 'political', I mean the position of the leading electoral parties). The latter could be overcome by the imposition of some kind of national government (like the UK from 1931) or even military junta; social hardship is of little real concern to the moneybags; the former could always be settled through a de facto nationalisation of the banks, in order to stabilise them.

There'll be protests against austerity and cuts. Burning tyres, smashed windows, angry scenes outside parliaments, fist fights within. The riot squads will be out in force. Financial scandals will continue. The class divide will widen. The rich will continue to be rich, and grow even wealthier. People's food banks will increase - but this will be charity rather than political organisation. Many people will live in hope of throwing out their currently oppressive governments at the next election, with the unstated knowledge that the next lot will be no better.

Where to from here? Yes, let's discuss.......

Re: Will The Cyprus Crisis Trigger a Revolution?

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:38 am
by kas
I think this same text could have been written equally well about Greece last year. And I hate to sound negative, but what would the colour of the revolution be?

So far, the frustrated masses have given voice to ugly neo-fascists in Greece and thinly veiled authoritarian right wingers and their neo-fascist lackeys in Hungary (which is also in a dire state economically).

My command of state or EU economics is too poor to present an argument pro or con to this article or opening up the mechanics of EU, but looking at things from within the Eurozone I am wondering about that "facade of State sovereignity". I seem to recall that we have been taught, time and time again, that the structures of State soverignity need to be lowered in order to make the EU system work better. And that the populists of any nomination have been strongly opposing this.

Still, I wouldn't give a State to just anybody who claim they can run it better without the EU.

An interesting article, but it is essentially a rant isn't it? All argument with very little factual content or analysis. That is my opinion anyway.

Re: Will The Cyprus Crisis Trigger a Revolution?

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 11:49 am
by NormanD
kas wrote:An interesting article, but it is essentially a rant isn't it? All argument with very little factual content or analysis.
Or suggestions...

The rise of the far-right should be a concern. Their mobilisation isn't just about being anti-immigrant. Frequently, they're radical enough to have the veneer of being pro-oppressed, anti-banker, anti-parliament, etc., and to appear to reach out to the increasingly hard-pressed and dispossessed 'middle-class' (i.e., those formerly employed and relatively well-off, and now being squeezed or impoverished). The anti-EU focus is a recruiter for nationalism.

Re: Will The Cyprus Crisis Trigger a Revolution?

PostPosted: Thu Mar 21, 2013 12:16 pm
by Adam Blake
Europe (and I include the UK) has a very long history of amoral aristocracy, with amoral royalty at the head. I wonder if this pattern is repeating itself - with "noble birth" being replaced by membership of the financial elite, ie, those who are accustomed to receiving in excess of, say, £1,000,000 a year for doing work that has no real social value beyond the perpetuating of the said financial elite.

This seems to me to be the real point the article is making - that a "new aristocracy" is forming, indeed has formed, and they will be as ruthless and as unscrupulous in their theft and oppression as the old feudal Robber Barons.

Norman is familiar with my Facebook "Troll"! Actually, he is an interesting fellow whose political views I abhor but whose 'take' on things is sometimes alarmingly similar to my own. He makes the point that 'real capitalism' (as in a genuinely free market) is no longer the model used by the banking cartels or the political puppets they place in office. When this open secret becomes more public knowledge, and more and more ordinary people attempting to run businesses become aware that the game is rigged - THEN you might see some kind of revolution. But I fear it might involve police states, martial law and a lot of right wing nationalist idealogues.

(sigh....)