Page 2 of 2

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 4:00 pm
by uiwangmike
I have 4 books about the Dead (one is by Phil Lesh) which I picked up at a swap shelf at the Briish Embassy here, but which I don't expect to get around to reading any time soon. If anybody's interested . . .
I saw them once, at Wembley Arena (about 1974?), and enjoyed the show, though they were more ragged than on their two country rock albums. Talking of which, Garth, as I mentioned here a couple of months ago, Ripple may owe something to Andrew Lloyd Webber.
The author of Angela's Ashes, Frank McCourt, had a daughter who became a Deadhead. He said he wasn't too upset when Jerry Garcia died.

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 6:36 pm
by will vine
Well this is all very interesting, meanwhile I am committed to an evening of ...I know not what...Something out of time, out of context, possibly out of tune, and out of kilter with the culture from whence it sprang. Strangely now looking forward to it all the more.

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Sun Jun 14, 2015 8:21 pm
by alister prince
As with Will and others, I've never really got the Dead or their appeal to vast amounts of heads and later era wish I'd been there heads. I remember as a (stoned) student (tortological?) suffering their endless guitar, drum, and bass solos. I decided their length was due simply to the fact nobody in the band knew how to stop. Like those train disaster movies where the driverless train ploughs on and on into to wilderness. So Will, I suggest you take a personal stereo and a good book...
Aly

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Tue Jul 07, 2015 3:25 pm
by will vine
OK...so I went to see this final gig. No expectations - sometimes a good way to travel.

Well this was extraordinary. I was absolutely spellbound for the full three and a half hours (as it turned out). This was not a bunch of seventy year olds you feared for each step of the way lest they didn't make the notes or trip and fall. This looked and sounded to me like a band at the top of their game.Clearly invigorated by the wonderful Jerry Garcia replacement Trey Anastasio they just delivered this wonderful non stop flow of tight but improvised music.

Andy Kershaw once described Tinarwen as not so much Rock'n'Roll as Roll'n'Roll and that seems to fit The Dead as well. It all flows on like a big friendly river.

I should not have liked this. Everything was wrong about it.

1) I was experiencing it secondhand, in a cinema.
2) It was yesterday's music, out of context, out of time.
3) It was going to be too clean -well rehearsed, no equipment breakdowns.
4) I wouldn't describe myself as a bone fide Deadhead. As a curious onlooker I felt like a stranger at the feast.

It worries me how much I enjoyed Rock music sitting back, mellowed out, with a few beers in the absolute comfort of a new theatre. Things need to be much more challenging than this. As for The Grateful Dead, if this was truly their swansong, they seem to have arrived at their destination with their music, if little else, in perfect shape and I feel like I've come in at the end of the film.

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2015 7:29 am
by DavidM
A footnote to the Grateful Dead discussion, here's an article about their Wall of Sound;

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-wall-of-sound

Looks awesome.

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Sun Nov 15, 2015 12:06 am
by Chris P
Fillmore West Live 69, such a good recording, just saying

Re: Dead in a Field

PostPosted: Sun Nov 29, 2015 4:16 am
by uiwangmike