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Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2016 12:04 am
by EleanorT
Here's an interesting article about his work and the republishing of some early recordings of Moroccan music. http://bit.ly/1SXh1HA

I've not read any of his books - have you?

In fact I've just read two excellent books about the Sahara that I highly recommend.

The first was "Sahara Man" by Jeremy Keenan. He wrote an anthropological book about the Touareg of southern Algeria where he spent a considerable amount of time thirty years before, but that one I've not read. In 2000 he returned after a long absence, and this is the story of what happened. I have spent just 5 weeks in Djanet, SE Algeria, where a small part of his travels took him - the rest of his journey was around Tamanrasset. I loved it. My time in the town of Djanet was just enough to whet my appetite, and this book was perfect for me...

And after that, I didn't want to leave the desert, so I picked up my old penguin classic copy of "The Secret of the Sahara: Kufara" by Rosita Forbes, about her long and gruelling journey across the Libyan Sahara in 1920-21. She was lucky to get out the other side, for sure. Benghazi was a small and remote coastal settlement. Dated for sure, but still rather gripping and other worldish.

Re: Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Mon May 09, 2016 9:00 am
by NormanD
He has always seemed to be one of those authors whom I've read more about than read. In various accounts of the life of William Burroughs, Bowles has been a fixture for those Moroccan days, although his life may well have been considerably straighter. The Sheltering Sky is highly rated, but it's always struck me as a bit too brooding for whatever mood I'm in when I've actually picked up a copy.

That Dust To Digital box set sounds interesting, but may be a bit much if your days of Moroccan herbs are now behind you.

Re: Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Tue May 17, 2016 5:11 pm
by uiwangmike
The local Cinematheque showed a nicely restored version of Visconti's Senso tonight, and I noticed his name appears in the writing credits, along with Tennessee Williams. Since the dialogue was all in Italian, with a bit of German for the Austrian bad guys, and there were several Italian writers involved including Visconti himself, I can't imagine what the two Americans contributed, but I'm sure the information is out there somewhere.

Re: Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 11:33 am
by john poole
Yesterday I watched Ben Rivers' new film "The Sky Trembles and the Earth is Afraid and the Two Eyes are Not Brothers" (possibly the longest title since the first two Tyronnaurus Rex LPs) partly based on a Bowles short story 'A Distant Episode' and filmed in Morocco. It's not without interest but probably requires much more patience than I possess these days (I was checking my watch frequently). The trailer gives a flavour (and is about 93 minutes shorter). A Guardian review described it as a "challenging, cerebral slow-burner "
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uasrYazieec

more here -
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kjwAhW46UQQ

The 1993 documentary on Paul Bowles, "An American in Tangier" is available to be seen here -
http://www.ubu.com/film/bowles_tangier.html

He does appear to have frequently attracted the attention of film makers -
http://www.paulbowles.org/films.html

Re: Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Sun Jun 05, 2016 12:24 pm
by NormanD
john poole wrote:..."The Sky Trembles and the Earth is Afraid and the Two Eyes are Not Brothers" (possibly the longest title since the first two Tyronnaurus Rex LPs)
Best laugh of the day so far. Thank you.

Re: Paul Bowles: his books and recordings + Sahara Man + Forbes

PostPosted: Mon Jun 06, 2016 3:31 pm
by uiwangmike
uiwangmike wrote:The local Cinematheque showed a nicely restored version of Visconti's Senso tonight, and I noticed his name appears in the writing credits, along with Tennessee Williams.

I discovered the Bowles and Williams wrote dialogue for the English dubbed version, but their names appear on all prints of the film.