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Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 10:18 am
by Garth Cartwright
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00tgcz ... mendations

My favourite female singer of the entire punk/new wave era is suitably brusque on Woman's Hour. Her solo album Stockholm is dull but as an interviewee she never is.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 18, 2014 10:38 am
by Adam Blake
Her current drummer is one of my students. I get a steady stream of anecdotes. Chrissie is relentlessly Chrissie at all times. My favourite is now in the public domain. On the subject of female performers such as Miley Cyrus: "It's not about 'fuck me', it's about 'fuck you!'"

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 4:34 pm
by Adam Blake
Latest anecdote:

At the recent Blondie/ Chrissie Hynde gig at the Roundhouse, sponsored by iTunes, she asked the audience: "So did you all get your free U2 albums?"
"YES!" came the roar of the crowd.
"Yeah, well you'll have to fuckin' buy mine", responded Chrissie.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 8:10 pm
by Chris P
I can't make my mind up who'd I'd rather have a light meal with; Debbie Harry, Chrissie Hynde, or Nigel Harrison. I've got a feeling they'd all be potentially good company, but luckily I haven't been invited yet, and am not particularly anticipating such an assignation. Do a new generation of 'rock' writers even exist. Is 'rock' even a thing? meep meep. r'n'r baybee, rockin off n over. The recent beeb Blondie equidistant lines rock doc was really well done absorbing, interesting stuff - sure it's on a separate thread already here

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 9:06 pm
by Adam Blake
If it was Chrissie you'd have to eat vegetarian.

The thing about Chrissie is that she's The Real Thing. She's what we grew up expecting rock'n'rollers to be: irreverent, funny, a bit reckless, smart, savvy. You know, like Iggy Pop or Lou Reed. It's so rare nowadays, they're such a vanishing breed, that when this kind of thing crops up I think it should be cherished and encouraged. As Garth said, her album is a bit dull, but she always gives good copy.

My friend in The Libertines has invited me to go and see them tomorrow at Ally Pally. I will go, and I will remember when they were just a bunch of kids at the Hope and Achor, and I daresay I will get nostalgic for rock'n'roll and all it once meant, because Pete Doherty - for all his many faults - is about as close as my kid's generation got to a real rock'n'roll star. (Example: at The Libertines reunion press conference a police siren went past. Pete put his hand up. "Taxi!" he said.)

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:05 pm
by AndyM
Adam Blake wrote: Pete Doherty - for all his many faults - is about as close as my kid's generation got to a real rock'n'roll star.


Hmmmmmm.........
There are two drawbacks with this argument:
i) He fits the rock star mould as designed/remembered by the parents of your kid's generation, and as such could be seen rather dated and reactionary in adhering to decades-old models rather than striving for anything new. Hip-hop/urban stars fulfil that function now, and there is shedloads more style & creativity in Kanye West or Pharrell Williams than in old retro-retard guitar/rebel white-boy bourgeois bollocks like The Libertines.
ii) The junkie fuck-ups of those older generations at least had the good grace to make some great records as well as poisoning themselves and spiralling down to self-destruction; sadly Pete D left the first bit out.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:30 pm
by Adam Blake
That's all true, Andy, but the generation of which I speak all grew up on their parents record collections and many of them hanker(ed) for an Iggy Pop, Jim Morrison, Keith Richards type figure they could call their own. Misguided or foolish it may have been, but it was true nonetheless and Pete Doherty filled the bill.

It's hard for me to talk objectively because I knew him before he became a junkie and he was a sweet kid and I liked him very much (even if he did steal my Auteurs album). I would say he did write a couple of good songs, and would have written a lot more if he hadn't allowed himself to play the celebrity junkie role that the media so wanted him for. It's a shame is what it is.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:39 pm
by AndyM
I'm not sure you're speaking about a generation but a rather tiny class fraction. White kids with vaguely boho parents who grew up in West and North London (and outlying environs thereof). Nice kids, in the main, but not all that representative. If you ask working-class white kids in Sunderland or Mansfield or Dundee or Belfast about Doherty, the best you could hope for would be baffled indifference. Even more so when applied to black kids from anywhere.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:46 pm
by Adam Blake
Yeah, well... I'll just shoot myself now for being middle-class again, eh?

The Libs have a lot of fans. I daresay some of them don't live within shouting distance of this computer.

(Even if I hadn't known him, I would have forgiven Doherty a lot for using the word "divvy" in "What A Waster".)

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:50 pm
by AndyM
Adam Blake wrote:Yeah, well... I'll just shoot myself now for being middle-class again, eh?



Oh stop it! All I ask of members of privileged groups is that they acknowledge the specifics of what/where they are. It's not hard. You just have to start by stopping assuming you're everyone!

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:52 pm
by Adam Blake
Told you I was incapable of objectivity!

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:55 pm
by AndyM
There's no such thing.

Or if there is, it's deathly boring.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Thu Sep 25, 2014 11:58 pm
by Adam Blake
The truth is that The Libertines have hundreds of thousands of fans all over Europe. They go to the shows and scream their little heads off, they rush the stage and injure themselves. They know all the words to the songs.

If Doherty did not have such a huge criminal record they would tour America too.

You dismissed them, Andy, for the reasons you've stated above, but their audience is too big to fit into the "tiny class fraction" you prescribe.

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Fri Sep 26, 2014 4:15 pm
by AndyM
Still not a 'generation', though.

And I said 'rather tiny'.

I'm an academic, I nit-pick about words for a living!

Re: Chrissie Hynde on Woman's Hour

PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2014 1:42 am
by Adam Blake
AndyM wrote: Even more so when applied to black kids from anywhere.


You also said this, and I resisted the temptation to say "apart from on The Libertines drumstool", but I'll say it now.

I just got back from the gig. It was fun. I drank champagne out of a paper cup and re-connected. The audience was huge and very mixed. A lot of proletarians out for a good time. Pete and Carl have stepped up the homo-eroticism onstage, more or less kissing at the microphone repeatedly. I daresay this would be rather irritating to you, Andy, but it occurred to me that it affords thousands of straight boys a flirtation with something "other". The flirtation with music hall persisted in the between song banter. In fact, they were The Libertines to the nth degree and it was enjoyable to hear the old songs again. This one was a particularly nice surprise, never released but I remember it from their very first gigs. "You'll never fumigate the demon, no matter how much you smoke..."

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-e7VWvtvRQ