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Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 11:26 am
by nikki akinjinmi
Hello,

You might this programme interesting.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b042zsxx

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 12:50 pm
by Alan Balfour
Nikki

Thanks for the heads-up on this, I've been a fan of hers since the No Depression magazine published a superb 12 page feature by Barry Mazor about her in 2003.

http://archives.nodepression.com/2003/0 ... forgotten/

Unfortunately the graphics have been stripped out.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 3:43 pm
by Garth Cartwright
Thanks! Allen Toussaint mentioned her when I interviewed him - she obviously made an impact in her time.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2014 4:33 pm
by Garth Cartwright
Have listened. It's OK but a bit silly. Not enough biographical focus on Cornshucks, too much emphasis on Tenderness which, altho Aretha and Otis both recorded it, does not signal that she was some major influence on later soul stars (I'm certain she wasn't). And the narrator describes Chicago blues clubs Legends and Kingston Mines as "notorious dives" when they are in fact mainstream live music venues aimed at white blues fans, both US and tourist. I rate them both as venues - they avoid the tourist trap cliches where bands sing Blues Brothers hits and endless Hoochie Coochie Mans - but they are so not South Side Chicago dive bars. A bit of a wasted opportunity really - Cornshucks was obviously a great live performer but no Memphis Minnie or Bessie Smith.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Sat May 17, 2014 10:36 pm
by nikki akinjinmi
Alan Balfour wrote:Nikki

Thanks for the heads-up on this, I've been a fan of hers since the No Depression magazine published a superb 12 page feature by Barry Mazor about her in 2003.

http://archives.nodepression.com/2003/0 ... forgotten/

Unfortunately the graphics have been stripped out.


You're welcome, Alan. Thanks for the link above.

Garth Cartwright wrote:Have listened. It's OK but a bit silly. Not enough biographical focus on Cornshucks, too much emphasis on Tenderness which, altho Aretha and Otis both recorded it, does not signal that she was some major influence on later soul stars (I'm certain she wasn't). And the narrator describes Chicago blues clubs Legends and Kingston Mines as "notorious dives" when they are in fact mainstream live music venues aimed at white blues fans, both US and tourist. I rate them both as venues - they avoid the tourist trap cliches where bands sing Blues Brothers hits and endless Hoochie Coochie Mans - but they are so not South Side Chicago dive bars. A bit of a wasted opportunity really - Cornshucks was obviously a great live performer but no Memphis Minnie or Bessie Smith.


I wasn't keen on the presenter's approach, but I went away and did some more research on Little Miss Cornshucks, and will probably listen to some of her other recordings at some point. The connection drawn with the singer, Ruth Brown, was interesting. Speaking of Ruth Brown, I still have Rob Hall's book which I've yet to read.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Wed Sep 24, 2014 6:17 am
by uiwangmike
I don't know if this current World Service docmentary is the same or a different telling of the story.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p026tsl9

And while I was searching, i found this Radio 4 thing by Mark Lamarr, When the Levee Breaks, about Memphis Minnie. I see another MM prog by Cerys Matthews (no longer available) was posted here, but I'm not sure about this one. If it was, it's still worth hearing anyway.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0183t4v

Anyway, it's remarkable that Radio 4 did MM twice in the space of a year.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 9:15 am
by Alan Balfour
I recommended someone read the wonderful No Depression feature about this artist only to learn from them it had g-o-n-e. After much mucking about I located it under a new URL thus:

http://nodepression.com/article/little- ... -forgotten

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 12:47 pm
by alister prince
Thanks for that Alan. No Depression is going back into print with special editions once or twice a year. They're looking for crowd funding. It's on their web sight. (Sorry can't do the link). It's worth signing up to their free emailed newsletter, always got something of interest and comes at least weekly.
Aly

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 1:29 pm
by Alan Balfour
Aly, the guy who wrote the Cornshucks feature has recently published a wonderful biography of Ralph Peer. Getting very favourable reviews.

Ta for heads-up and info, I'll check out the what's what. Free newsletter sounds right up my street.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 2:50 pm
by Garth Cartwright
I've read the Ralph Peer biog'. It's ok but not great. Mezor wrote a biography of Jimmie Rodgers a few years ago and obviously decided to turn all his info' from that on Peer - Rodgers discoverer, producer, manager - into a bio'. So you get lots of Rodgers and The Carters but very very little on the African American musicians he worked with: Will Shade, Blind Willie McTell, Louis Armstrong (who did not like Peer, Mezor tells us, but does not explain why) etc. A huge omission, in my mind. And as Peer settled down into a very corporate publishing life in a Beverly Hils mansion the book becomes very dull - his passion became growing flowers so you get info on his holiday in NZ where the species he enthused about grew, hey! Worth a read for the info' on the early days of the US recording/ publishing industry but something of a missed opportunity.

Re: Little Miss Cornshucks - Try A Little Tenderness

PostPosted: Mon May 25, 2015 5:35 pm
by alister prince
Hmm,Alan and Garth, food for thought in your comments on the Peer bio'. My prejudice has been of a bit of a shyster who published trad material credited to popular artists. It also raises the question, did the artists benefit from his promotion of them enough to warrant the negatives. Discuss...
Aly