Page 1 of 1

2009 - week 6, from 13 February - Mountain Music

PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 11:54 am
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Tafiychuk Family - Pasture One - Carpathian Mountain Music - Ukraine - Koka - 034CD-10

2 - Picaflor de Los Andes - Carrito de Pasajaras (Traveller's cart) - Huaynos & Huaylas: The Real Music of Peru - Peru - Globestyle - CDORBD 064

3 - Aynur - Ahmedo - Keçe Kurdan - Turkey (Kurdistan) - Kalan - CD 293

4 - Bill Monroe & the Bluegrass Boys - Mule Skinner Blues - Going Back to Old Kentucky - USA - Indigo - IGOCD2535

5 - Zainidin Imanaliev - Kűidűm Chock (I Burn, I Smoulder like Charcoal) - Tengir-Too: Mountain Music of Kyrgystan - Kyrgystan - Aga Khan Trust - SFW-CD 40520

6 - Yungchen Lhamo - Ngak Pai Metog - Yungchen Lhamo - Tibet - Real World - CDRW72

7 - Huun Huur Tu - Oske Cherde - Best - Live - Tuva - Jaro - 4236-2

----------------------------------------

Is there any link between the music from countries in mountainous regions? This programme was inspired by a whim, after listening to an album of traditional music from the Carpathian Mountain of Ukraine, which reminded me of various other records, herewith strung together. Only at the end did the sound seem to change entirely, with the dense and intense throat singing of Tuva. Otherwise, there was lots of space and air, pretty much what you might expect.

Image
Tafiychuk Family

The album of Carpathian Mountain Music arrived in a package of traditional Ukraine music sent from Poland at least two years ago. Much of it defeated my tolerance but on returning to this one, I was reminded how attractive the playing is.

Image
Picaflor de Los Andes

For many of us whose interest in music from the rest of the world fits into the time frame of what has come to be known as world music, David Byrne opened the door to Peruvian music with his compilation of African-influenced songs, Soul of Peru. Soon afterwards, Ben Mandelson expanded our horizons further with the provocatively title Real Music of Peru, hinting at the pre-African influences of the village music of the mountains, collectively known as Huaynos & Huaylas (pronounced, approximately, waynoes and why-las). Wild saxophones and ecstatic singing stick in the head years after the album was last listened to..

Image
Aynur

Aynur is a traditional singer from the Kurdish region of Turkey, who captured my heart as a guest performing live at the WOMEX trade fair in Seville 2006. She has made other records since her debut, but Keçe Kurdan (Kurdish Girl) remains the one to recommend.

Image
Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys

In the United States, mountain music implies the banjos and fiddles of bluegrass music from the Appalachian, pioneered by Bill Monroe and the Bluegrass Boys, with a few yodels thrown in.

Image
Zainidin Imanaliev

Of the last three artists, all from countries on different slopes of the Himalayas, Zainidin Imanaliev feels closest to what Westerners think of as the blues, but when I asked Zainidin if he had ever heard the blues as a young men, he angrily retorted that the only music he was allowed to hear on the radio back then was whatever was being peddled by the Communist regime in Moscow.

Image
Yungchen Lhamo

Yungchen Lhamo is a Tibetan singer whose career has been boosted by the Peter Gabriel’s Real World label. On ‘Ngak Pai Metog’, she sang all the voices, assembled by producer Hector Zazou as a backing group to accompany her lead vocal.

Image
Huun Huur Tu

Finally, the powerful sound of Huun Huur Tu, the group which has become the bet-known of the many exponents of what the West refers to as throat singing. In Tuva, this is simply how people sing.

Many thanks to the forum contributors for their suggestions for this programme.

Re: 2009 - week 6, from 13 February - Mountain Music

PostPosted: Fri Feb 13, 2009 12:08 pm
by Dominic
Charlie wrote:
1 - Tafiychuk Family - Pasture One - Carpathian Mountain Music - Ukraine - Koka - 034CD-10

The album of Carpathian Mountain Music arrived in a package of traditional Ukraine music sent from Poland at least two years ago. Much of it defeated my tolerance but on returning to this one, I was reminded how attractive the playing is.

Available from Stern's: http://www.sternsmusic.com/disk_info.php?id=034CD-10

Image

PostPosted: Sat Feb 14, 2009 11:35 am
by Des
Sounds fab - just ordered it!

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 8:38 pm
by Charlie
Irony alert:

email from: Danny Carr, London

I caught the last 10 minutes of this weeks show and I felt I must write to congratulate you on what I assume must have been the presentation of a cutting edge musical project, where people were recorded playing their instruments for the very first time. Not many Radio stations would have dared pushed this barrier in the name of art. It was a truly awful sound, which I guess symbolises something about the very colour of the universe, in a musical medium.

---------------------

CG reply: if only you had heard the whole show, Danny, you would have enough material for a comedy spot on Live at the Apollo

emails

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 8:44 pm
by Charlie
email from:

1. poolak nath, chennai, india

thanks for broadcasting such exclusive root music from around the world. I am a musician/Programmer from a very small state called Assam located in the North Eastern region of India. By listening to your programs I collected some confidence to tell you to please expose our folk music through BBC. For your kind information I am a full time professional keyboard programmer so I can handle the technical aspects of the matters. If you are interested then please write to me.

-------------------------

2. Paul Wehn, Green Village, NJ USA

Dear Charlie: Just wanted to let you know how much I enjoy your program. I listen to it whenever I can. I love the Huun Huur Tu piece that you played. I want to suggest a program for you. I have always adored a certain style of Greek music and only recently discovered that the music I liked was was the music of the Pontic Greeks (Pontus- Black Sea). You can find this music on YOU TUBE by searching for Roza Eskenazi. Any of her songs are beautiful and there is a incredible story her life.

------------------------------------
CG reply - thanks Paul, I've tracked her down on the compilation Rembetika Vol 2 and will play a song in a few weeks

-----------------------------

3. Freda Tepfer, Walla Walla WA USA

The Feb 14 show on Mountain music had a piece that sounded very much like the Klezmer Classic Romania. Of course the Klezmer tune may have gotten the idea from the music you played. I don't know which one would have come first. It was one of these CD's. songs. Carpathian Mountain Music, Keçe Kurdan, Tengir-Too: Mountain Music of Kyrgystan The song Rumania was written by Aaron Lebedeff and was recorded in 1925.

Here is a link to Romania
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aeJGN9wUn5o

-------------------------------------------------

4. tom ryan, tucson, AZ USA

I am delighted to hear early American folk music. I recently heard a song by Bill Monroe, Mule Skinner Blues, that I had not heard since perhaps the late 50s. The song has been in my head so many years without a clue who performed it. "Hey Waterboy, bring the bucket here . . . "

How fun to recall the enjoyment I got hearing it as a little child anew.

Thank you.

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:07 pm
by Dayna
That was good. It was also the first time I've heard that version of Mule Skinner Blues.

PostPosted: Sun Feb 15, 2009 9:23 pm
by danny
Charlie wrote: if only you had heard the whole show, Danny, you would have enough material for a comedy spot on Live at the Apollo


Hello.

Yes, it was said tongue in cheek. These people do have more musical talent than I ever will and I did hear it on a bathroom mono am radio.

The music in the show is different to the stuff played everywhere else around me, which is one reason I am happy to listen to it, respect those making it, and perhaps be transported to the environment that influenced their choices.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:47 am
by garth cartwright
Is Danny Danny Baker? He sometimes plays snippets of world music on his BBC London show as examples of comic foreigners. I must admit, he does make the music seem unintentionally funny in a way I had not considered before.

PostPosted: Mon Feb 16, 2009 11:53 am
by Gordon Neill
I suspect Danny Carr is Danny Carr. Actually, it was refreshing to hear a slightly contrary voice. I was starting to think that Charlie just made up all these congratulatory emails! But Danny's comments made me think of those old HM Bateman cartoons 'The Man Who.....'.

PostPosted: Tue Feb 17, 2009 11:18 am
by Charlie
Gordon Neill wrote: I was starting to think that Charlie just made up all these congratulatory emails!

I only make a few of them up, Gordon, obviously including this one, from:

1. Don Ellis, Vilnius, Lithuania

Charlie Gillett's music is fascinating. Play more frequently, please.

and this too, probably, from:

2. ms. petei guth, alpine, texas

Hi charlie - my friend paul listens to you on sirus radio and i listen on the internet. we both agree that 30 minutes just isn't enough. keep up the great sounds. we both live in the mountains of far west texas, close to the mexican border. it's the largest county in texas and only has 10,000 inhabitants. take care, thanks again petei

---------------

but this poetic fragment would be beyond my imagination:

3. luke scherschel, bloomington, indiana USA

i happened to catch your show really early on sunday morning...

it was dark and cold at 4 am

and with all the snow we've had lately,

i guess i could relate to higher altitudes.