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2008 - week 46, from 16 November

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 6:16 pm
by Charlie
note incorrect playlist previously posted

link to show: http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/progr ... lett.shtml

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- artist - song title - album title - Country - label - cat no

1 - Ayarkhaan - Heavenly Maidens - Ethno Group - Russia (Yakutia) - T Diamond - 978-5-7696-2816

2 - Pukatja Kungkas - Uwa Wiya - Rough Guide to Australian Aboriginal Music - Australia - World Music Network - RGNET1207CD

3 - Gaâda Diwane De Béchar - Taguerebet - Arabesque Vol 4 - Algeria - MoZik - 020743 40017

4 - Liliana Montes - Kilele - Pacifico Colombiano - Colombia - Otrabanda - OTB09

5 - Odade Wethu - Ngiyagula - Kuyoxaban' Amadoda - South Africa - Gallo - CDGMP 41002

6 - Kocani Orkestar - Romani Čaj (Gypsy Girl) - The Ravished Bride - Macedonia - Crammed Discs - CRAM 46

7 - Ersatzmusika - And Why? - Voice Letter - Russia - Asphalt Tango - CD-STR 1407

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Ayarkhan is a vocal group from the very far north of Siberia, the area known locally as Yakutia, where singers often mimic the sounds of animals and birds as part of their songs. Having met the singers during my only visit to the region, it was a great surprise and pleasure to receive their luxuriously packaged CD (and even to discover a photo of myself with the singer, very small and unidentified, pictured alongside my companion for the trip, Misha Maltsev, who is himself originally from Yakutia).

If there is no logical geographical reasons for switching from Yakutia to Australia, the coincidence of the two albums arriving together in the same mail delivery was enough to make a connection that sounds very comfortable, musically.

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Gaâda Diwane De Béchar

‘Taguerebet‘ by Gaâda Diwane De Béchar is turning into one of the hits of the year, as far as listeners to this programme are concerned.

Liliana Montes is among many artists previously unknown to me, included on the compilation Paficico Colombiano. She sounds sophisticated, modern and someone we need to know more about.

My friend Ben Mandelson came back form a recent South African trip with two trophies that he was kind enough to lend me. I played the first as soon as it was put in my hand, and now bring you the second, another modern mbaqanga track by Odade Wethu that roars along in a style I thought was long gone, never to be heard again. The big South African label, Gallo, is involved again (as it was in the early career of the late, lamented Miriam Makeba) but seem no more concerned to promote this music outside Southern Africa than was the case fifty years ago.

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Kocani Orkestar

Of all the big brass bands from the Balkans, Kocani Orkestar feels the most sophisticated and accessible, with good vocalists to vary the pace, timbre and attack.

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Ersatzmusika

While much of the music played on this programme is/was recorded for a local audience with little consciousness that anybody else might be interested. But the musicians in Ersatzmusika are well aware that their fascinating sound might reach far beyond both Berlin, where they are based, and Russia, the source of their material.

emails

PostPosted: Mon Nov 17, 2008 6:34 pm
by Charlie
emails from

1. Tim Heath, Banbury

Charlie, You have played the track 'Taguerebt' by Gaada diwane Bechar from the Arabesque 4 compilation a couple of times. This track is from the excellent Gaada CD 'Ziara' which I managed to get very easily and quickly from a French online store via the Gaada website www.gaada.net.

They have concert clips on YouTube and have played recently in Paris and at the well-named 'Bledstock' festival in Tunis. T

hanks for the introduction

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2, Elhaddi, Chaska, MN, USA

Thanks again! Thanks a million. I woke up to Heavenly maidens then to Tguerrabt. No one could have my day better in this awful awful business climate.

I set up my clock to 3am to wake up and work to release a product, turned on the coffee pot and then National Public Radio. The music was familiar yet distant. Thank you again.

Well At 6pm today, I went back to your site and had a nice dance with my 2 year old. Keep the good work. We'll listen and listen. Dig and dig to find more treasures!!

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3. Eddie Philpott-Kent, Norwich

What a pleasure to find you again after so many years - Sundays, London: Remember? But what an extraordinary time to be on. Luckily I had too much to drink in the Fat Cat, and woke up in the middle of the night with the wireless on.

I just had to listen to Liliana Montes again rather than go to bed.

Best wishes

Eddie

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4. Gail Artley, Goole, UK

Dear Charlie,

I enjoy listening to your world acquired tracks. They are interesting and varied.

I enjoyed hearing the Australian aboriginal group, performing Uwa Wiya.

However, you called them "aboriginals". "Aboriginal" is the adjective, and "aborigine" is the noun. They are "aborigines", who play "aboriginal" music.

It is a common mistake, even made by aborigines themselves, but I like these things to be correct, especially by credible radio presenters.

Yours faithfully,
Gail Artley

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5. martyn mills, Ampthill,

Hi, there was a track played on last weeks show from an australian aboriginal band , 2nd track on the programme the track could be purchased on rough guide to aboriginal music, having bought the correct disc from catalogue number it is not on this album can you supply correct information please

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6. Pauline Simons, Eski Foça,nr. Izmir,Turkey

Taguerebet - just fabulous! (My partner still asking if you've found Helin yet (Kurdish group) & how about the odd track from Ahmet Kaya? Thanks as always for a great programme.(Great that you sometimes play Sezen Aksu too!)

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 4:03 am
by judith
Thank you. I was so confused after I'd listened, I thought perhaps what I'd heard was show #45, I do have to wait a day or so to hear the program.

If this is the show without an obvious theme, I would have to say "It doesn't matter what language it's in..." (Charlie) or "No matter what language you speak..." (Pukatja Kungkas). In total, what I received from the show was harmony, emphasis on vocals - whether Acapella, voices above kick ass percussion, call and response, or female lead with male chorus. Harmony, balance, and keep on rocking - whispy and vague maybe, but in my mind, obviously so.

[by the way, I have a recording of a song which sounds much like Heavenly Maidens titled "Thanksgiving Song to the Godess Aiyyhyt" (Khatylaev Family "The Sacred Thread of Creation). It is a beautiful song.]

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 8:20 am
by Gordon Neill
Tim Heath from Banbury said:

the track 'Taguerebt' by Gaada diwane Bechar...is from the excellent Gaada CD 'Ziara' which I managed to get very easily and quickly from a French online store via the Gaada website www.gaada.net.


This is becoming like the search for the Holy Grail. I've been after this CD for months now. My trembling fingers clicked on the above link..... only to get a message indicating that the site no longer exists. At least I think that's what it says. Its in French, so it might have just been taunting me and saying 'better luck next time, matey'.

Sir Galahad

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 8:57 am
by Con Murphy
Gordon Neill wrote:Tim Heath from Banbury said:

the track 'Taguerebt' by Gaada diwane Bechar...is from the excellent Gaada CD 'Ziara' which I managed to get very easily and quickly from a French online store via the Gaada website www.gaada.net.


This is becoming like the search for the Holy Grail. I've been after this CD for months now. My trembling fingers clicked on the above link..... only to get a message indicating that the site no longer exists. At least I think that's what it says. Its in French, so it might have just been taunting me and saying 'better luck next time, matey'.

Sir Galahad


"La meilleure chance de temps prochain, camarade."

Actually, you just need to take the dot off the end of the address:-

www.gaada.net

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 9:13 am
by Gordon Neill
Ah! Thanks Con. I should have spotted that. Now I just need to learn French and the CD is all mine! All mine!

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 9:50 am
by Charlie
Gordon Neill wrote:Ah! Thanks Con. I should have spotted that. Now I just need to learn French and the CD is all mine! All mine!

Is it that simple? I followed through and could not find a way to make the purchase

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 9:56 am
by Con Murphy
Charlie wrote:Is it that simple? I followed through and could not find a way to make the purchase


To the right of the Myspace link, click [Acheter], put Ziara in Quick Search, press Go, et voila the rest is standard online purchasing practice.

PostPosted: Tue Nov 18, 2008 10:06 am
by Charlie
Con Murphy wrote:To the right of the Myspace link, click [Acheter], put Ziara in Quick Search, press Go, et voila the rest is standard online purchasing practice.

Thanks, Con, you are right, it is that simple, but in my impatience I followed Ian A's advice from many moons ago by going to Alapage among the French mail order companies on our links page, and hopefully the precious item is on its way.

Caveat (monolingual) emptor

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 1:42 pm
by Philellinas
If you beat the drum for Levantine music (as I do), a knowledge of Greek and Turkish are extremely useful as English is not always the passe-partout. If you look up the details of a Greek CD on a site like www.musical.gr you can select the "In English" option. However, all you get is transliterated Greek. Today I came across "v' foni" and I defy any non-Greek speaker to decipher this. In fact, the second letter in the Greek alphabet is pronounced "vee" and is used to denote "second" while "foni" means "voice" and the whole thing means "on backing vocals". Here endeth the first lesson.
If you buy CDs from a company like Kalan in Istanbul sometimes you receive comprehensive background notes and lyrics in about 5 languages courtesy partly of the estimable Bob Beer. The neglected album "Yahudice" is an excellent example. When, however, Kalan have no Beer money you get very little. For example, another early neglected Kalan CD , "Yana yana" by Fikret Kizilok, only has the names of the musicians, including fortunately Erkan Ogur.
You monolinguists should have paid more attention at school.

Re: Caveat (monolingual) emptor

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 5:30 pm
by Charlie
Philellinas wrote:You monolinguists should have paid more attention at school.

This is undoubtably true, although our school did not have the best French teachers and did have probably the worst Latin teacher on Tees-side. But you are quite right to say I should have paid more attention

PostPosted: Wed Nov 19, 2008 7:08 pm
by Chris P
Welcome to the forum 'Phil the Greek', good to have another Turkish music fan on board, and one who knows Erkan Ogur's music to boot. My Greek appreciation isn't up to par, but I do like Psarantonis (something - perhaps a rejected Cd you gave me - tells me you don't tho').
How about opening up a seperate 'Levantine' thread here for Turkish and Greek music....?

Edit : I've gone & done it:
http://www.charliegillett.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?p=53881#53881