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2008 - week 22, from Sunday 1 June

PostPosted: Fri May 30, 2008 12:02 pm
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Augusto Santos - Olivida ese Hombre - Bachata Rosa - Dominican Republic - iASO - iASCD3

2 - Dog Murras - Kamussekele - Rough Guide to African Street Party - Angola - World Music Network - RGNET1201CD

3 - Lo'jo - Brûlé la Mèche - Tu Connais Lo'jo - France - Emma - 984 705-2

4 - Bako Dagnon - Salimou - Titati - Mali - Discograph - 613 3012

5 - Umalali - Hattie - Garifuna Women's project - Belize - Cumbancha - CMB-CD-6

6 - Orchestre National de Barbès - Tu n'est plus comme avant (La rose) - Alik - France/Algeria - Soudani/Wagram - 313 0492

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Are more compilations being released than ever, or do they form a higher proportion of new releases? Either way, I confess to setting them aside if I recognise most of the artists, but this week we start with two that introduced me to new names, one a retrospective that has been played before, the other a new collection of recent releases.

Bachata Rosa is a marvellous collection that brings together 12 stars of the Bachata country style from the Dominican Republic; its heyday was in the 1960s but it still gets everybody dancing around the room. The appeal of Augusto Santos’s song is in the syncopated, almost stumbling rhythm of his guitar.

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Dog Murras

Compiled by London DJ John Armstrong, The Rough Guide to African Street Party is an adventurous selection of relatively unknown names including Dog Murras from Angola, whose song is earthy and relentlessly infectious.

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Lo'Jo

I still have a copy of the first Lo’Jo album produced by Justin Adams way back in 1993, Fils de Zamal, on which I scribbled the note, ‘sub-Negresses Vertes, terrible vocals’. Five years later, they improved a lot for Mojo Radio and were even better a year later on Bohéme de Cristal. Since then, they have continued to be a formidable live group but never fulfilled their potential in the recording studio. Now they’ve released a 2 x CD retrospective collection, Tu Connais Lo'jo, CD One drawing from all of the above albums and more, CD Two featuring tracks by 21 artists they like – Les Têtes Raides, Tinariwen, Musafir, etc. I admit to being bewildered and disappointed by their perversely inaccessible selections from their own work, finding nothing I wanted to play until reaching the last track, the still captivating 'Brûlé la Mèche' (from Bohéme de Cristal).

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Bako Dagnon

I thought I was familiar with all the big names of Malian music, so was surprised to read that Bako Dagnon is a widely-admired female singer in her sixties who has released several albums in Mali and was revered by Ali Farka Touré. On her first international release, there’s no doubt about the power of her delivery, and the modern production and adventurous arrangements avoid most of the pitfalls that bedevil so many contemporary West African albums with commercial ambitions.

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Umalali

There’s nothing to add to previous comments about The Garifuna Women’s Project by Umalali, which continues to sounds better and better. No need to scour it for the best tracks; just turn the wheel and play at random. It will never let you down.

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Orchestre National de Barbès

Welcome back to Orchestre National de Barbès, who have been away too long. Name after the district of Paris favoured by immigrant from North Africa, they play a sort of Algerian rock music that sits alongside Rachid Taha. Alik is a consistently good if belated follow-up to their last album from at least ten years ago.

1st of June

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 12:00 pm
by CantSleepClownsWillGetMe
A very enjoyable show this week Charlie, with some nice run-ons between songs.

I want to buy them all!

June

emails

PostPosted: Sun Jun 01, 2008 4:24 pm
by Charlie
email from:

1. Henry Mutebe, Kyambogo University, Kampala Uganda

hello BBC.

I WOULD LIKE TO APPRECIATE YOU FOR THIS WONDERFUL PROGRAM. I LIKE THE MUSIC THAT IS PLAYED BECAUSE IT REFLECTS THE STYLE AND CULTURES OF PEOPLE ALL OVER THE WORLD.

HOWEVER I WOULD LIKE TO FIND OUT, SOME OF THIS MUSIC IS JUST TOO GOOD TO LISTEN TO, BUT WE HAVE NO ACCESS TO IT HERE IN MY COUNTRY. HOW WILL IF I GET THIS MUSIC FROM BBC?

I AM A PERSON THAT IS SO PASSIONATE WITH MUSIC THAT SOUNDS FROM THE HEART LIKE THE ONE YOU ALWAYS PLAY. I JUST REQUEST THAT YOU HELP.

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reply from CG:

Thank you Henry for your heartfelt message

I regret that the BBC cannot supply the music direct

My website includes links to mail order suppliers, but I think their prices might be high, by African standards

I don’t know of a mail order supplier based in Africa

Charlie
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2. Steve Laffy, Rugby, England

Dear Charlie

Just wanted to contact you to say thank you for single handedly championing world music for so long. I first heard you on Radio London in the 70s when you and Dave Simmons (Soul '77) started playing all of these wonderful sounds. I have pursued my career as a drummer over the same period, and have made a life's ambition to combine world music with my English rock n roll roots. The work continues!!

Adios y bueno suerte mi amigo.

www.stevelaffy.co.uk

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3. Mounir Banoub, Karlsruhe, Germany

I find your programme very interesting and a compilation of world sounds. I usually hear it at 3:00 local time , with a bit of interferences, but lately I hear on the internet too. Been hearing the BBC since 1960 mostly at night with ear-phones, yours is a program I found that is not only interesting but also compensates sleepless periods too. Thanks a lot for the tasteful choices.
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4. Gabriel Read, Providence, RI, USA

Bako Dagnon is amazing! Salimou is an enchanting song. I would love to hear more from this album.

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5. Arnaud Ntirenganya Emmanuel, Rwandan in Cameroon

Hello Charlie,

many thanks for the sounds from Angola "Kamussekele" and "salimou" from Mali. indeed very nice.

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6. mardelle, london

hello,

i love some of the music on this. I am American in London - where does one find the CDs or MP3 downloads for this? In the States; NPR sells the discs. Do you?

Thank you for a great show.
MJC

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reply from CG

the BBC doesn't sell the music directly, but there are links on this site to the people who do. And my annual compilations pick up some of the favourites

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7. Lamin, Freetown, Sierra Leone

well for this week salimu is the best track for me, though i enjoy all the other tracks. since the day i first listen to your program, i made it a point of duty not to miss it at all. my musical taste is very wide, if a song is good no matter what type or which part of the world its came from, i will enjoy it. your program suits me well for the large variety. i just hope to listen to more different songs.

PostPosted: Mon Jun 02, 2008 12:23 am
by Evangeline Kim
Hi Charlie!

Wondeful always to tune in to your programs streaming across the pond. Am one of your ardent fans here in NYC and beyond. Am delighted to hear the "Bachata Roja" tracks you throw down - all my favorites - as well as your infinite joy in sharing all the music you like.

Always,
Evangeline Kim

4 - Bako Dagnon - Salimou - Titati - Mali -

PostPosted: Tue Jun 03, 2008 8:21 pm
by Eddie Punch
Good Evening Mr. Gillett

Bako Dagnon


What an amasing voice. At first I thought the singer was Salif Keita. Wrong ! Oh well....but I'm sure the guitarist must have been Djelimady Tounkara or if I'm wrong again, then who is he and where's he (or she) been for the last 10 years ?


Eddie Punch
(planning my next escape to Southern Morocco to hear and learn more Saharawi music)