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2008 - week 1, from Jan 5

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 6:45 pm
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Markku Peltola & Buster Keaton Tarkistaa Lännen Ja Idän - Paha Kurki - Markku Peltola & Buster Keaton Tarkistaa Lännen Ja Idän - Finland - Ektro Records - EKTRO-32

2 - Tewelde Redda - Milenu - Very Best of Ethiopiques - Eritrea (*) - Manteca - mantcd215

3 - Ishtar y Los Niños de Sara - Alabina - Rough Guide to Latin-Arabia - Israel/France - World Music Network - RGNET1175CD

4 - Yasmin Levy - Una Nocha Mas - Mano Suave - Israel - World Village - 450003

5 - Shantel vs Rona Hartner & DJ Click - Inel Inel De Aur - The Edge of Heaven - Germany/ Romania - Essay - AY CD 16

6 - Free Spirits - Kanak Mangal - Free Spirits - UK/India - Tuk Tuk - TUK01

(*) corrected after receipt of email below from Elsa

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There's a spate of interesting albums by instrumental groups around at the moment, and two of them act as the bookends this week. Like many radio programmers, I tend to use instrumentals as elastic bands to tie up the programme, using as much or as little as there is time for at the end. That’s partly because musicians playing instrumental music seem to have abandoned all thought of radio play and extend their tracks far beyond the tolerance of most radio producers. This week, we start with one as well.

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Markku Peltola (or could it be Buster Keaton?)

The American silent film comedian Buster Keaton features in both the band name and on the cover of the by album Finnish guitarist, Markku Peltola, hinting at the humour of the arrangements and the sounds within. He does have one 12 minute tune and two more that are over six, but four hover around the three minute mark. The music roams between jazz, folk and Markku’s rich imagination.

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Dharambir Singh
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Lewis Watson; Bhupinder Singh Chaggar; Neil Harland
[photos of Free Spirits courtesy www.jazzaction.co.uk]

Free Spirits comprises four musicians from Leeds in the North of England, who confound my low expectations of improvised Indo-Jazz. For each mini-masterpiece by musicians in this field, there are many acres of meandering meaninglessness, but this outfit makes each moment matter.

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Addis Ababa, early 1970s

Playing ‘Milenu’ by Tewelde Redda out of context, I thought I had found a track by a Tuareg group from the Malian border, but then realised that this is just another of the gems uncovered on The Very Best of Ethiopiques, properly recognised as Compilation Album of 2007 (in any genre) in The Observer’s Music Monthly Magazine.

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Ishtar y Los Niños de Sara

In the mid-1980s, when Gipsy Kings were conquering the Western world, Los Niños de Sara, another Spanish-speaking group from Montpelier in South West France, set out with a similar sound. They were doing only OK until they ran across Ishtar Alabina, a young Israeli who had come to France looking for musicians to sing with. The song ‘Alabina’ launched the combination to a long lasting career in France and Spain, but as far as I know they never played the UK. Confusingly the singer is sometimes billed as Ishtar, other times as Alabina. The song resurfaces on the highly recommended compilation, The Rough Guide to Latin Arabia.

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Yasmin Levy

‘Una Nocha Mas’ (One Night More) continues to feel like the ‘hit’ from Yasmin Levy’s latest album, the one I keep coming back to after listening again to the other songs.

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Rona Hartner and DJ Click
[photo courtesy www.tv5.org]

I first encountered Rona Hartner in Tony Gatliff’s film, Gadjo Dilo, in 1997, when I had the impression that she was first of all an arresting actress who sang only as a sideline. I haven’t kept note of all her activities since, but she turns up as a very convincing singer on the soundtrack of the forthcoming film The Edge of Heaven, for which Shantel is music consultant and composer. The whole album is strong, but the standout song is the collaboration of Shantel, Rona and DJ Click, ‘Inel Inel De Aur’.

Re: Alabina

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:08 pm
by CantSleepClownsWillGetMe
Confusingly the singer is sometimes billed as Ishtar, other times as Alabina


To cause even more confusion, I got this track (as a download) a couple of years ago and it's called 'Eres Tu' by (or so I thought) a band called 'Alabina'. But it does help to explain why I found it so hard to locate more of their music!

June

Re: Alabina

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 7:20 pm
by Dominic
CantSleepClownsWillGetMe wrote:
Confusingly the singer is sometimes billed as Ishtar, other times as Alabina


To cause even more confusion, I got this track (as a download) a couple of years ago and it's called 'Eres Tu' by (or so I thought) a band called 'Alabina'. But it does help to explain why I found it so hard to locate more of their music!

June

Both Wikipedia & an official looking Ishtar Alabina site claim that the band was called Alabina. As far as I can tell, there were then 2 solo albums as Ishtar before deciding on Ishtar Alabina for 2005's "Je sais d'ou je viens". Hope we're all clearer now.
http://www.alabina.info/index.php

PostPosted: Fri Jan 04, 2008 8:01 pm
by pirkko
Markku Peltola was an actor-musician, part of an actors' cooperative Telakka, in Tampere, they run a theatre-club/restaurant-gallery there.

He became more well-known after Aki Kaurismaki picked him to star in the movie The Man Without the Past, which won the Cannes Grand Prix in 2002. I remember him, however, as one of the guys from Telakka, who booked the bands and took turns washing the dishes in the restaurant kitchen, Grand Prix or not.

He died early Monday:
http://kamera.blogspot.com/2008/01/aki- ... ltola.html

emails

PostPosted: Sat Jan 05, 2008 5:19 pm
by Charlie
email from:

1. Elsa


Hi charlie, you made a mistake. Tewolde Redda is Eritrean singer.

Check http://music.eriplanet.com/index.php?=& ... elde+Redda

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2. Arnaud Ntirenganya Emmanuel - Rwandan in Cameroon

Hi Charlie,
I did enjoy the sound from Ethiopia very much.

I would like you to play some sounds of Masabo Nyangezi and Byumvuhore Jean Baptist from Rwanda.

You can get in touch by brousing their sites using their names. Thanks.

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3. Richard Camber, London, UK

Charlie. "Los Ninos de Sara" = "The Children of Sara" and not "The Children of the Sahara".

It's Spanish, you know !

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4. raphael altman, oxford, uk

how ironic that charlie is wanting to learn Spanish!

Last night, after the track Alabina, he said that Ishtar had been singing in Spanish - she hadn't - the male in the troupe had sung in Spanish, while her contribution was in Arabic.

(Hence 'Latin-Arabia' in the album title.)

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5. Name: Harold Levy, Mobberley, UK


Found Friday's programme excellent, particularly Alabina but I am unable to source a site from which I can download , and pay for it.

Could you advise?

Thanks again for your exciting choices

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CG reply: any advice, forumistas?