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2007 week 30, from 28 July - Talking Turkey

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 11:00 am
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Ska Cubano - Istanbul (not Constantinople) - !Ay Caramba! - UK/Jamaica/Cuba - Casino - CAS20051

2 - Eartha Kitt - Uska Dara - a Turkish Tale - My Heart Belongs to Daddy - USA - Camden - 74321 569632

3 - Sezen Aksu - Sanima Inanma - Turkish Groove - Turkey - Putumayo - PUT 248-2

4 - Sabahat Akkiraz + Orient Expressions - Kaleden Kaleye Sahin Uçurdum (Temir Aga) - Sound of the World - Turkey - Warner Classics & Jazz - 5144218402

5 - Aynur - Ehmedo - Crossing The Bridge - Turkey - Soda - SODA022

6 - Sivan Perwer - Heybiyênin - Beyond Istanbul - Turkey - Trikont - US-0355

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Ska Cubano

The recent Turkish election was the pretext for this all-Turkish show, which starts with two songs recalled from my childhood. At the time, I didn’t understand the significance of the switch from Constantinople to Istanbul, which we’ve seen repeated many times since as new government have regularly declared their independence from colonial domination by renaming their principal cities. No doubt there was mockery in the minds of American Tin Pan Alley writers Jimmy Kennedy and Nat Simon when they wrote ‘it’s Istanbul (not Constantinople)’ but somehow the pride comes through anyway, and the song has survived to be revived by Ska Cubano on their most recent (2005) album, !Ay Caramba!

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Eartha Kitt

Eartha Kitt was deliciously daring in the pre-rock ‘n’ roll era of Doris Day and Georgia Gibbs, sounding like she was singing without any clothes on. In some ways, it’s a pity that she does an English-language talk over during ‘Uska Dara,’ which is otherwise all in Turkish. But it doesn’t alter the remarkable idea of an American singer making a valiant attempt to sing in Turkish. Can a Turkish speaker let us know how good/bard her accent is – is the song intelligible?

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Sezen Aksu

Sezen Aksu is such a big star in Turkey, she should surely have been voted Best Middle Eastern Artist in the BBC Radio 3 Awards for World Music by now. But she has not even been nominated. Time for some lobbying.

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Sabahat Akkiraz

I missed the recent performance in London by Sabahat Akkiraz, another major star at home in Turkey, but was happy to have coincidentally included a track by her on my latest annual compilation, Sound of the World.

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Aynur

Sabahat’s collaborators on the track, the DJ/producers Orient Expression, are among eleven artists featured in an excellent documentary Crossing the Bridge, which records a visit by the German musician Alex Henke to Istanbul a couple of years ago, where he met musicians across a wide range of styles, including buskers, rappers and the Kurdish singer Aynur, whose performance here is from the CD that accompanies the DVD of the film.

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Sivan Perwer

Finally, another Kurdish singer, Sivan Perwer, who lives in Germany these days but is still very popular with his people back home.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 26, 2007 7:06 pm
by Chris P
I'm looking forward to this programme - have to catch it on the (mon or tues ?) repeat or the archive tho' (Womad beckons).
Nice to see that wear n tear on Siwan's saz top - he plays as he sings : with passion.
And totally agree about Sezen Aksu - she should have collected a whole bunch of awards, and also consequently given extra concert platforms over here. I recommend 'Deliveren' as a great album of hers (altho' I've only heard it once). It's a lot cheaper to buy via Ebay than the ridiculous prices at amazon etc, who don't realize there's been a rerelease.

On the Sabahat Akkiraz theme I was staggered that according to Seb Merrick, and the Guardian article last week, that she performed to 2,000 at a "Day-Mer" Turkish/Kurdish festival in this country. This one came in completely under the World Music forums and press radar - I'd have loved to have gone to that. I wonder how many great musicians come in to play to their communities without us outsiders getting a sniff of info ?

Maybe it explains why Sabahats QEH concert was only about half full (or the freak weather). Anyway I thought Smadj's SOS were truly good, whereas Orient Expressions came across as pretty dull (those programmers on their computers at the back to blame - the musicians including a great young singer and a superb percussionist, were very good). Just my biased opinion tho' I suppose.

emails

PostPosted: Mon Jul 30, 2007 10:39 am
by Charlie
emails from:

1. Shaun Dampier, Holcombe Rogus , Devon, UK

Loved the Turkish night yesterday. We need you repeated on daytime 4 or 2 please.

Two CDs I like are Samia Farah (1999) sony french 494770 2 .

And the Bass Gang "evasioni & fughe " - especially pulp bass or bass fiction - on Italian independent label NBB11

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2. Sam Robinson, Phuket, Thailand

Well I only wish to say what another fine, fine programme. As usual within your selection there is 'a' song. The combination of sound, feeling feet on that ground, eyes looking around, the being there, and to be transported . . . again.

Thank you, from an old geezer, Sam

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3. Tom Liska, Berlin-Kreuzberg, Germany

Dear Charlie,

The German musician in the documentary Crossing the Bridge: The Sound of Istanbul (İstanbul Hatırası: Köprüyü Geçmek, 2005) is called Alex Hacke, aka Alexander von Borsig - http://www.hacke.org/

I remain
Your regular listener,

Tom

Re: emails

PostPosted: Tue Jul 31, 2007 9:18 am
by Charlie
[quote="Charlie"]emails from:

1. Shaun Dampier, Holcombe Rogus , Devon, UK

Loved the Turkish night yesterday. We need you repeated on daytime 4 or 2 please.

Two CDs I like are Samia Farah (1999) sony french 494770 2 .

And the Bass Gang "evasioni & fughe " - especially pulp bass or bass fiction - on Italian independent label NBB11

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2. Sam Robinson, Phuket, Thailand

Well I only wish to say what another fine, fine programme. As usual within your selection there is 'a' song. The combination of sound, feeling feet on that ground, eyes looking around, the being there, and to be transported . . . again.

Thank you, from an old geezer, Sam
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3. Peter O'Leary, Malahide, Dublin, Ireland

Heard your Turkish programme early this morning and Eartha Kitt singing 'Uska Dara' brought back fond memories of a flotilla sailing holiday off south-west Turkey in 1982. We visited Bozborun where the local mayor playing the saz and two others on clarinet and drum were lined up to entertain us. I had my flute with me, on which I played the only Turkish tune that I knew, which was 'Uska Dara' The response was great as the three locals swung in to accompany me and to sing the tune at the tops of their voices. A great night was had by all and I even managed to introduce them to some traditional Irish jigs and reels from my home town of Graignamanagh in Co. Kilkenny.

Kind regards,

Peter O'Leary

PostPosted: Fri Aug 03, 2007 12:49 am
by Dayna
I liked all these.
I've heard other versions of Istanbul( not Constantanople) before. Not sure who it was by.

PostPosted: Wed Aug 08, 2007 12:52 pm
by joel
Bit surprised by the lack of a Kardes Turkuler track in there.