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PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 1:41 am
by Caireann
Ted wrote: - thats your choice - although you'd be denying yourself some of the greatest musical pleasures the planet has to offer and why would anybody do that?

But you used language that has traditionally been used by white people who hate black people. Comparing african musicians to chimpanzees and the use of the term "jungle music" puts you in some pretty unpleasant company. I'm hoping you used these terms because you weren't aware of their history.


@ Charlie,
Thanks for the kind explanations.
Initially I also thought African music was interesting. Well, everything new is interesting when you listen to it the first time, but it quickly became boring to me. There is so much more interesting going on.

@ Ted
The greatest musical pleasures are for me from South America. There you notice it can be with a lot of rhythms but its less monotonous and less boring.
For that "jungle Music": I believe you are probably too young to have ever watched for example the series Daktari or Tarzan. From there came that comparison. There you could always hear the drums speak.

Re: 2009, week 47, from 21 Nov - Classic Albums, Part One

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 7:14 am
by Willy
"In 1987, recording pioneer Michel Vuylsteke went to Burundi in East Africa where he made several recordings that have been widely recognised as classics in their very different spheres, three of them included in today’s programme. "

-Oops, you mean 1967 as quoted on the show.

Re: "Rhythm is the soul of life'.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 9:45 am
by jackdaw version
liz molony wrote: . . . mmm what a legacy we have from Africa......

It's my belief that it is because we are ALL descended from Africans (look it up if you don't believe me — but that is the accepted academic version of the human adventure) that African music (and its diaspora derivatives) has such power and universal appeal. It touches something very deep within us. Those who are immune to its charms are likely to be spending too much time consorting with twelve-foot-tall lizards and other alien influences, possibly US Republicans or AGW deniers.

Re: "Rhythm is the soul of life'.

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 10:30 am
by Ted
jackdaw version wrote: consorting with twelve-foot-tall lizards


I think some of them actually ARE 12 foot lizards..

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 11:26 am
by r.allibone
Charlie wrote:
Caireann wrote:I always had the feeling that Charlie is more of an Africa specialist and that's why he plays so much from there. Maybe it is because in Africa were loads of British colonies.

I never was a specialist, Caireann, well not in African music anyway. If I was ever a specialist, it would have been in music from the Southern states of the USA. Which I suppose you could classify as a former British colony, but I never think of it that way. More to the point was most of that the music I happened to like was by people descended from Africans.

No, African music just crept on me unawares and certainly not because of any colonial ties. Probably the first African record I became obsessed with was 'Soul Makossa' by Manu Dibango (from a former French colony, Cameroon) back in 1972 - a friend has just sent a message noting that in a 1973 issue of Let it Rock magazine I logged my three favourite albums as being by the Allman Brothers (from Macon Georgia), Denise LaSalle (Mississippi) and the aforementioned Manu Dibango.

When I did start to explore African music, ten years later, it's true that my first exposure was to the music of former British colonies, Ghana and Nigeria, but I soon moved onto Zaire (formerly Belgian) and then to several West African countries that had been under French rule. I doubt if colonial connections were relevant, apart from determining which European countries provided the industry infrastructure to record and distribute the music.

The gate to my previously narrow tastes opened one creak at a time, first to African music and gradually including the Middle East, Europe and Latin America. I may now be on the brink of stretching to absorb South Korea, time will tell.

The point is that it all has to 'join up,' ie sound coherent when played next to each other. I can't bring myself to play something from a particular country just so that I can say I have done so, and so if you are sitting there with an atlas in front of you, hoping to tick the countries that have been represented, you will soon get even more frustrated than it seems you already are.

But I reaffirm that you're welcome to make any comments that occur to you. As you rightly say, if you don't leave them here, where could you leave them?


I am confused. I thought you played music from anywhere and from any time hoping to please some of us some of the time. But now you mention just a few regions and is South Korean music different to North Korean? we may find out when you do your football world cup progamme or programes. But the lady(?) doing all the complaining this week must be patient.

I did not enjoy to much of it all that other than the Burundi girls but you making the point about similarities with western artists makes me wonder if you plan to demonstrate? I think you have pointed out sometime in the past how alike the Burundi girls and The Train and the River sound.

So is there a followup programme?

Thank you for 'stone cold dead in the market 'recently (on Radio 3)

PostPosted: Mon Nov 23, 2009 1:56 pm
by Charlie
r.allibone wrote:I am confused. I thought you played music from anywhere and from any time hoping to please some of us some of the time. But now you mention just a few regions

I was just trying to explain how I came to appreciate African music after years of listening mostly to American music. I was not suggesting I was about to go back and retrace my steps.
r.allibone wrote:Is South Korean music different to North Korean?

I don't know, but believe that South Korean musicians play music representing the whole country, from the North as well as the South. Culturally, it is still one country even if politicians have split it in two.
r.allibone wrote:you making the point about similarities with western artists makes me wonder if you plan to demonstrate? I think you have pointed out sometime in the past how alike the Burundi girls and The Train and the River sound.

So is there a follow-up programme?

I had not planned a programme on the World Service playing the same tracks followed by similar western tracks , but may pitch the Inanga against Tom Waits in a future World on 3 show as suggested by Jim Anderson in the email messages.

Re: emails

PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 10:32 am
by Charlie
Jim Anderson wrote:Have you noticed the extraordinary similarity between Francois Muduga — Chante Avec Cithare and Tom Waits' Trouble's Braids from Swordfish Trombones Album?

Just listened to these back to back and Jim's right, you can hardly spot the join. Vic Feldman is credited with 'African talking drum'.

Now, which Dr John track do I need to complete the sequence? That's a rhetorical question, I'll figure it out for myself

PostPosted: Tue Nov 24, 2009 5:23 pm
by jayaram
Hello,

I enjoyed last weekend's programme on the World Service and thought it had a John Peelish touch to it, by which I mean, the rhythms reminded me of the sound of his programmes.
I must confess I didn't care all that much for John Peel's music but his enthusiastic introductions held me from switching off. A marriage of that kind of rhythm and your taste in World Music proved to be a good one last weekend.

Bests
Jayaram