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2009 - week 41, from 10 October

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 12:11 pm
by Alan
posted on behalf of CG

BBC World Service from 10 October (week 41)

Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Khaled - Hiya Ansadou - Liberté - Algeria - Wrasse - Wrass 239

2 - Queen Ifrica - T.T.P.N.C - Montego Bay - Jamaica - VP - VPCD1841

3 - Mohamed Ilyas - Panya - Taarab - Zanzibar - Chiku-Taku - CHITa 01

4 - Queen Ifrica - Daddy - Montego Bay - Jamaica - VP - VPCD1841

5 - Fat Freddy's Drop - Pull The Catch - Boondigga & The big B.W. - New Zealand - Fat Freddy's drop - DRP013

The Algerian singer Khaled is no longer the force he was fifteen years ago, and seems to have slipped behind Rachid Taha as North Africa’s best known music ambassador. For me, there’s no comparison: Khaled is a true from-the-heart African singer; Rachid is just an old French rocker who happens to have been born in Algeria. (Having just received but not yet heard the new Rachid album, perhaps I should hold my tongue until I’ve checked it out.)

Image
Khaled at the Olympia in Paris 2009, photo Banning Eyre

Just because Khaled has a voice to die for, doesn’t mean he will make a good record simply by emptying his lungs. He needs good songs and appropriate arrangements. On his new album Liberté he gets both, at least for some of the time, thanks to the sympathetic production touch of Martin Meissonnier. This is the same Frenchman who rescued Fela Kuti back in the early 1980s, when he simultaneously introduced King Sunny Ade to the world outside Nigeria, so the man ‘has form’, as they say these days. ‘Hiya Ansadou’ catches Khaled at his most passionate and controlled, if that is not a contradiction in terms.

Image
Khaled with producer Martin Meissonnier photo Banning Eyre

After I played this track by the Jamaican singer Queen Ifrica on Radio 3 recently, forum correspondent Neil Foxlee pointed out that I was pronouncing her name wrong – it should be Queen I-frica. Unfortunately, I had already recorded this programme before receiving this advice so you will hear me get it wrong again. Neil also explained the meaning behind the cryptic song title: “T.T.P.N.C. is apparently a Tribute To the Pitfour Nyahbinghi Centreâ€

Fabulous stuff!

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 4:19 pm
by kastamonu
What a great programme this week - spirits lifted, dancing round the house again! Queen I-Frica - great! And your description of Zanzibar - oh I really want to visit one day! Thanks Charlie.

Re: 2009 - week 41, from 10 October

PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 8:47 pm
by Ian A.
Alan wrote:posted on behalf of CG
Most of the time, the records I play in these programmes tend to be the same as those which get reviewed in the world music magazines and in the ‘world music’ slots in the UK’s quality daily paper, but I have not noticed much attention being given to the new album by Mohamed Ilyas from Zanzibar.


Sorry, can't let that one pass. It received an enthusiastic lead review with a photo back in our May issue, in which it was also in our Playlist chart. There was also a track on our Aug/Sept fRoots 33 covermount. Interestingly, when I emailed the pre-release track list of that fRoots compilation around the folk & world music radio DJs to enquire which of the source albums they had already played at that point - answer, hardly any - that was the only one which had received airplay from nearly everybody.

Re: 2009 - week 41, from 10 October

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 1:26 am
by Charlie
Ian A. wrote: It received an enthusiastic lead review with a photo back in our May issue, in which it was also in our Playlist chart. There was also a track on our Aug/Sept fRoots 33 covermount. Interestingly, when I emailed the pre-release track list of that fRoots compilation around the folk & world music radio DJs to enquire which of the source albums they had already played at that point - answer, hardly any - that was the only one which had received airplay from nearly everybody.

You are quite entitled and right to protest. Like any other bad journalist I made a sweeping generalisation without noting the important exception, which, as so often, you remain.

Incidentally, many thanks to Alan for sorting out and correcting the inaccurate playlist I left him with while I gallivant off to a music trade fair in Korea, which is where I am making these comments. The wonders of modern magic.

Re: 2009 - week 41, from 10 October

PostPosted: Tue Oct 13, 2009 7:15 pm
by judith
Charlie wrote:while I gallivant off to a music trade fair in Korea, which is where I am making these comments. The wonders of modern magic.


Korea. That's a surprise. And no one would have known you were there. Doesn't uiwangmike comment from Korea?

Re: 2009 - week 41, from 10 October

PostPosted: Wed Oct 14, 2009 12:20 am
by Charlie
judith wrote:Doesn't uiwangmike comment from Korea?

He does indeed and is somewhere else at a film festival while I am in his home town. We hope to hook up, but my UK Vodaphone-fed mobile does not work out here. The world is not yet quite round.

PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 2:20 pm
by garth cartwright
Nice selection, Charlie. You are right about Mohammed's album being one of the year's gems. I think I lent my copy to Florence so had overlooked it recently but do recall how beautiful it sounded. Very well played and recorded. Linking FFD with the Jamaican DJ was inspired.

PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 10:19 pm
by Andrewq
Listening to Queen Africa's Daddy was the most uncomfortable 4 minutes -and so it should be, and I 'm not even a dad.
That was Friday morning then later in the day was the news that a girl in Cardiff had been sexually abused by her step father, step uncle and brother in law since she was 5 years old - they were imprisoned indefinitely.
I don't listen to R1 these days so have no idea if it has been picked up any of the DJs but this is one of the last taboos and the track needs as much airtime as possible.Try and get the track played again on World on 3