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2009 - week 39, from 26 September

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 11:09 am
by Charlie
Seq - Artist - Song Title - Album - Country - Label - Cat no

1 - Lester Bowie - The Great Pretender - The Great Pretender - USA - ECM - 1209

2 - Momo Wandel Soumah - Toko - Afro Swing - Guinea Conakry - Fonti Musicali - FMD 217

3 - Les Triaboliques - Gulaguajira (I, The Dissolute Prisoner) - rivermudtwilight - UK - World Village - 468088

4 - 17 Hippies - Son Mystère - Heimlich - Germany - Hipster - HIP 012 LTD

5 - Ernesto Lecuona - Malaguena - Cuban Originals - Cuba - RCA - 74321 69937 2

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Alert listeners to World on 3 on Dec 18 will have already heard the segue of Lester Bowie into Momo Wandel Soumah. Forgive me, I liked it so much, I used it twice.

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Lester Bowie

Trumpeter Lester Bowie was a member of the Chicago-based experimental jazz co-operative, AACM (The Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians), and founder of the Art Ensemble of Chicago. I found much of his music inaccessible, but was introduced to this reworking of the well-known Platters’ hit when it was played at the memorial of Charlie McKissack, a music fan who was for many years the coordinator of volunteers who answered the phone during my BBC Radio London programme, Honky Tonk. Our mutual friend Max Reinhardt had held discussions with Charlie about the music each of them would like to be played at his funeral, and Max chose this as the tune to be played while we all filed out of the hall. Hearing Lester’s unearthly voice seeming to speak to us from the heavens was very disturbing, and the song remained a family favourite for some years afterwards.

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Momo Wandel Soumah
[photo courtesy www.Marimbalafon.com ]

Momo Wandel Soumah was a saxophone player from Guinea Conakry. Having once been a member of Keletigui et ses Tambourinis (played in this programme quite recently), Momo became leader of his own group and recorded a couple of outstanding albums of which Afro Swing remains the best. Many thanks to Katerina Lobeck who several years ago brought back from her trip to Guinea a various artists compilation which included ‘Toko’, leading me to contact the Belgian record label that had first released Afro Swing. Having been an admirer of Ornette Coleman and John Coltrane, Momo would have appreciated being linked to Lester Bowie.

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Lu Edmonds of Les Triaboliques

Although Howard Male reports hearing more than one good track on the album by Les Triaboliques, I cannot find anything to match the one I played before, so here it is again.

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17 Hippies

I have played ‘Son Mystère’ by the 17 Hippies several times before, and remain frustrated that it has not surfaced into the big wide world. Surely the people who like Jacques Brel would appreciate the craft of the song.

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Ernesto Lecuona

For the recent programme of recordings made in 1928, I was set to play a tune by the Cuban pianist and composer Ernesto Lecuona. Alert producer Radek Boschetty noted that although the tune I planned to play was indeed written that year, the recording was actually made as recently as 1956, so I hastily inserted a substitute that really was made in 1928. But I still wanted to play the man himself, so here he is, composer of many long-time standards including ‘Siboney’ was well as this one, ‘Malaguena’.

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 9:08 pm
by CantSleepClownsWillGetMe
Alert listeners to World on 3 on Dec 18 will have already heard the segue of Lester Bowie into Momo Wandel Soumah. Forgive me, I liked it so much, I used it twice.


Missed this first time around but I don't blame you for wanting to play the sequence again, it was absolutely perfect.

June

PostPosted: Sun Sep 27, 2009 9:52 pm
by Alan
another lovely programme

listen again at http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/console/p004cc5d

emails

PostPosted: Tue Sep 29, 2009 11:19 am
by Charlie
email from:

1. Clive Sutherland, London &Thailand


All I can say to u Mr Gillett is what r u doing on the World Service - for ONLY 26 MINUTES!? It should be AT LEAST an hour & twice a wk. Who's in charge? Give me their email, I'll have a word, I must protest!

Besides those classics last Sun, the French Son mystere is sublime & new to me. Is the rest French/German/other as its German title etc.? And what's the signif. of 17 Hippies if any? Sorry for all the questions, but am addicted with only Putumayo & the odd world song on Passion 4 the Planet here.

Clive

email

PostPosted: Wed Sep 30, 2009 12:57 pm
by Charlie
email from:

2. Matthew Abercrombie, Bacton, Suffolk, UK

Charlie,

I blame you, from the first rolling chords of Sultans of Swing to The Gangbe Brass Band & Lhasa, Fools Gold is the most haunting song.

What was the first track on the 27th September? Sounded like The Battle Hymn of the Republic? Glory, Glory, Hallelujah.

Thought of Herbie Mann? Hunter S. Thompson. Where Were You When the Fun Stopped.

You've only cost me £1,000-ish in albums.

Keep it up!!
Matthew Abercrombie,

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3. N. Jayaram, Hong Kong

Thank you for Toko.

Also for Son Mystere by 17 Hippies. I found their
Jovano Jovanke on YouTube. Worth noting in your programme - a contrast to Kennedy-Kroke version

N. Jayaram, Hong Kong

PostPosted: Thu Oct 01, 2009 9:18 pm
by r.allibone
CantSleepClownsWillGetMe wrote:
Alert listeners to World on 3 on Dec 18 will have already heard the segue of Lester Bowie into Momo Wandel Soumah. Forgive me, I liked it so much, I used it twice.


Missed this first time around but I don't blame you for wanting to play the sequence again, it was absolutely perfect.

June
what's Lester Bowie up to, trying to out-Freburg Stan, or show that intense avant garders who appear to live on arts council grants have a sense of humour? But, whatever, I found it an enjoyable addition to the world of music mix thank you

Toko, Son Mystere

PostPosted: Wed Oct 07, 2009 5:21 pm
by jayaram
Hello,

Thank you for playing Toko by Momo Wandel Soumah again. I had in fact been remembering and mentally humming it just a few days ago. It was the fourth or fifth time at least that I heard it (all the previous times most probably on your programmes on the World Service, though it's possible I repeat-heard it on the Internet by going to World Service or Radio 3.)

A few months or weeks ago, you played Son Mystere by the 17 Hippies
(repeated again recently). I looked for them on YouTube and found their
version of Jovano Jovanke, which is excellent, to say the least. You might consider playing it on your programme at some point of time.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GQ8cj6Ch5QE
I'd heard the Kennedy and the Kroke Band version of Jovano Jovanke on your programme a few years ago and found it mesmerising. Comparisons are odious but the 17 Hippies' version is worth noting.

(And while on YouTube, you might want to check out Manu Chao's Me Llama Calle. Manu Chao has been another one of numerous introductions afforded to great music by your programme. I find Me Llaman Calle as posted on YouTube to be extremely well filmed, if a bit too romantically, given it is about people in a very often dangerous profession. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzZWXUfIyIs)

Best Regards

Jayaram