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PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:03 pm
by Charlie
One by one, you've listed all the records I might have thought of and many more.

Do 'Watermelon Man' by Mongo Santamaria and 'El Watusi' by Ray Barretto count? They feel like they do. 'Grazing in the Grass' by Hugh Masekela is borderline, but I'd include it. Bert Kaempfert's 'African Safari'? Maybe not, but it sounds surprisingly authentic.

There were dozens of hits songs with Mambo in their titles during the mid-fifties (Pete Frame lists them all in The Restless Generation) but apart from Perez Prado's 'Mambo #5' I'm not sure if any qualify as they were mostly (all?) done by pop artists.

'Maria Elena' by Los Indios Tabajaras, Brazilian instrumental, top 5 in the UK in 1963

Los Trio Paraguayos, whose name came up in another thread a few months ago: http://youtube.com/watch?v=KKjsgPWkUPQ

Re: World music before world music

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:14 pm
by Charlie
Neil Foxlee wrote:Suggestions for a (virtual) compilation of World music before world music?
ie African, Latin &c UK/US pop hits before the concept of world music emerged. Eg Miriam Makeba's Pata Pata, Hugh Masakela's Grazing In The Grass, Peanut Vendor ... well, that's three for starters, but there must be many more

Sorry, I've just seen that you had Grazing in the Grass in this opening salvo, and I repeated it in my last post.

Maybe you could avoid such repetition (and Rob Hall's wrath) by listing what we've got so far.

Why only make it a virtual compilation, Neil? You could collate everything here and submit it to Steve Bunyan at Union Square Music.

On a different tack, I wonder if any British record label is planning to meet the ever-growing Polish population in this country by providing them (and us) with a compilation of the best Polish music around, pop, folk, jazz - it could sound great.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 12:20 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Thanks Charlie.
"Los Paraguayos is a music group consisting of musicians from Paraguay. Since its foundation in the 1950's, the group has featured many singers and musicians, playing guitars, bongo drums and a Paraguayan harp. The group performs many South American and Mexican tunes and songs, including classics, such as Guantanamera, El Cóndor Pasa and La Bamba." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Paraguayos
- which took me to:

"El Cóndor Pasa is a song from the zarzuela El Cóndor Pasa by the Peruvian composer Daniel Alomía Robles written in 1913 and based on traditional Andean folk tunes. It is possibly the best-known Peruvian song worldwide" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_C%C3%B3 ... %28song%29

and:

"La Bamba" is a traditional song created in the Mexican state of Veracruz over 300 years ago. Influenced by Spanish flamenco and Afro-Mexican beats, the song uses the violin, jaranas, guitar, and harp, and is sung in falsetto. Lyrics to the song greatly vary, as performers often improvise verses while performing. However, versions (such as those by musical groups Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan and Los Pregoneros del Puerto) have survived due to the artists' popularity and have become the "definitive" versions. The traditional aspect of "La Bamba" lies in the tune itself, which remains the same through all versions. The name of the dance, which has no direct English translation, is presumably connected with the Spanish verb bambolear, meaning "to shake"." http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Bamba_%28song%29

- hence the Gipsy Kings' "Bamboleo", no doubt: "I am shaking", though perhaps one can't rule out the possibility that "bambolear" has the same slang connotations as the French "branler"...

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 1:12 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Charlie
Why only make it a virtual compilation, Neil? You could collate everything here and submit it to Steve Bunyan at Union Square Music.


Well, I had thought this might be a possibility, but was waiting for some sign of interest/encouragement - I know from experience how difficult it can be to get projects like this off the ground.

What's needed now (apart from a round-up of potential tracks) is a snappy title - The Roots of World Music? Suggestions please (and if by any chance this does get off the ground, I'd hope to be able to credit all contributions).

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 2:55 pm
by Ali
Wasn't Burundi Beat by the drummers of Burundi a chart hit following the success of Adam & The Ants / Bow Wow Wow? Around the same time Double Dutch by Malcolm McLaren a South African township jive troubled the charts and Abele Dance by Manu Dibango was popular in the soul clubs even if it didn't get in the top 40.

Then around 83/84 Hot Hot Hot by Arrow and Lorraine by Explainer although I'm not convinced either actually made the chart.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:06 pm
by Con Murphy
Ali wrote:Wasn't Burundi Beat by the drummers of Burundi a chart hit following the success of Adam & The Ants / Bow Wow Wow? Around the same time Double Dutch by Malcolm McLaren a South African township jive troubled the charts and Abele Dance by Manu Dibango was popular in the soul clubs even if it didn't get in the top 40.

Then around 83/84 Hot Hot Hot by Arrow and Lorraine by Explainer although I'm not convinced either actually made the chart.


I'm pretty certain Lorraine didn't, but Hot Hot Hot might have. From a similar period, how about Lambada by...who was it that made the top 40 in the '80s with a version of that?

Edit: Kaoma:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5AfTl5Vg73A

Still sounds good to me.

Edit encore: just realised this came out post-world music, so I guess it doesn't count.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:29 pm
by Con Murphy
Maybe getting a bit obscure here, but what about Willie Colon's Che Che Colé, which is based on an old Ghanaian children's playground song? When you learn that, you suddenly realise that West Africa is seeping from every pore of the song:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UL9bW6YRoEg

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:34 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Lambada - 1989, therefore post- emergence of "world music" as a term (c. !985 - Graceland etc). Thanks anyway.

Hot Hot Hot is 1982, so just qualifies.

Apparently Burundi Black derives from a field recording from Musique du Burundi (Ocora, 1968) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bow_Wow_Wow .

Malcolm McLaren's pioneering Duck Rock (1983 - see http://www.ireallylovemusic.co.uk/guest/greg_wilson.htm for an interesting piece on this) incorporates bits of African music into the mix, but because it's a collage belongs more to hip-hop than world music, perhaps.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:37 pm
by Ali
Che Che Cole what a great track! Antibalas the NY Afrobeat band did a decent version of it a couple of years back. This reminds me of 2 other contenders, Set Fire To Me by Willlie Colon and Jingo by Candido.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:49 pm
by Neil Foxlee
The line-up so far (licensing might prove a headache, and then programming - chronological might not work well):

* additions from after this post

AFRICA:
Little Kid Lex - New Year Rock (1958) (Afrikaan Beat)
Miriam Makeba - Pata Pata
Hugh Masakela - Grazing In The Grass
Elias & His ZigZag Jive Flutes - Tom Hark (normand)
African Dance Band of the Cold Storage Commission of Southern Rhodesia - Skokiaan
* Babatunde Olatunji - Jin-go-lo-ba [added]
Manu Dibango - Soul Makossa
Solomon Linda & His Evening Birds - Mbube (Wimoweh/The Lion Sleeps Tonight)
Drumming from Musique du Burundi (Occora, 1968) - basis for Burundi Black
(Bert Kaempfert - Swinging Safari - anyone know the original if there is one?)

LATIN:
Tangos - El Choclo (Kiss of Fire), Adiós Muchachos (I Get Ideas), La Cumparsita (Strange Sensation) ???
El Condor Pasa (zarzuela written 1913 - version?)
*??? - La Cucaracha [added]
Mariachi Vargas de Tecalitlan OR Los Pregoneros del Puerto - La Bamba
Jose Fernandez Diaz - Guantanamera
Rita Montaner OR Antonio Machin/Don Azpiazu and his Havana Casino orchestra - El Manisero (Peanut Vendor)
* Xavier Cugat with singer Miguelito Valdés - Perfidia [added]
Perez Prado - Qué rico mambo (aka Mambo Jambo) OR Mambo No. 5
*Getz/Gilberto (or Pery Ribeiro?) - Girl From Ipanema [added]
*Jorge Ben - Mas que nada [added]
*Walter Wanderley Trio - Summer Samba [added]
Mongo Santamaria - Watermelon Man
Ray Barretto - El Watusi
Joe Cuba Sextet - Bang Bang
Los Indios Tabajaras - Maria Elena
Los Paraguayos ?

CARIBBEAN:
Lord Invader - Rum & Coca Cola http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rum_and_Coca-Cola )
Mighty Sparrow - Jean and Dinah (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_and_Dinah)
(Harry Belafonte - Banana Boat Song)
Arrow - Hot Hot Hot
- and I think Millie's My Boy Lollipop should go in there (even if it was recorded in the UK)

OTHERS ('Beware the Greeks bearing gifts' ;-) :
Michalis Patrinos rebetiko band - Misirlou (as covered by Dick Dale and in klezmer) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Misirlou
Zorba's Dance
Never On A Sunday (Chaquito or Makadopoulos & his Greek Serenaders? both scraped the UK charts, with non-Greek competition. Can't remember it - too poppy?)

Edith Piaf - Milord (her only UK hit)

Thoughts/more suggestions welcome - I'm certainly not saying all the above should be included, particularly some of the latter ones.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 3:57 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Babatunde Olatunji - Jin-go-lo-ba (adapted by Santana for their track of the same name on their debut LP). dylan refers to him in I Shall Be Free / The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan / 1963

What I want to know, Mr. Football Man, is
What do you do about Willy Mays, Martin Luther King, Olatunji?

See: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babatunde_Olatunji

Xavier Cugat with singer Miguelito Valdés - Perfidia (1940, covered by Nat King Cole and many others, eg in rocksteady by Phyllis Dillon) - I assume this version, though perhaps not the original, is in Spanish; this was the big hit in the States

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 4:51 pm
by Rob Hall
Has there been no mention of hits from Brazil yet? "Girl From Ipanema" and "Summer Samba (So Nice)" would seem to qualify, others can probably think of more.

Also, the Spanish folk tune "La Cucaracha" has been recorded by many people (including Charlie Parker according to Wikipedia) but I'm not sure that anyone had a hit with it so maybe it doesn't qualify.

PostPosted: Thu Nov 01, 2007 5:24 pm
by Neil Foxlee
Of course... I always meant to include Girl From Ipanema - should we go for the Getz/Gilberto version? first commercial recording was in 1962, by Pery Ribeiro. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Girl_From_Ipanema

La Cucaracha (cockroach) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Cucaracha - Charlie Parker recorded this for Verve and Louis Armstrong in 1935, but is there an 'authentic' version?

Summer Samba - Walter Wanderley Trio 1966 - Wanderley was Brazilian, so OK, tho' I don't know it
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summer_Samba

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:18 am
by Neil Foxlee
Late addition:
I think someone mentioned Osibisa, who had two UK hits: Sunshine Day and Dance The Body Music, both in 1976. Anybody know and care to comment on these?

Looking at the Chart Geography section of my old Guinness Book of Hit Singles (1993 ed.), I see that there were 11 artists from South Africa, 3 from Guyana (Eddy Grant being one), 8 from Greece, 1 from Sri Lanka, 3 from Kenya, Rest of the World (inc. Latin America) 40, but Jamaica 70, proving my earlier point about it being a special case.

At some stage, I suppose I'll have to go through the A-Z to check...

PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2007 11:23 am
by Con Murphy
Neil Foxlee wrote:Late addition:
I think someone mentioned Osibisa, who had two UK hits: Sunshine Day and Dance The Body Music, both in 1976. Anybody know and care to comment on these?


I thought of Osibisa, but didn't think those records were 'rooted' enough, ie superficially they sound like they could have been made by a UK or US disco act. It has been a while since I've heard them though, so I stand to be corrected.