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Re: John Legend & The Roots : Wake Up

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 2:09 am
by Tom McPhillips
the new CeeLo Green Ladykiller album is a treat for those who love this sort of thing too..

stunning production...

Re: John Legend & The Roots : Wake Up

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 11:17 am
by Adam Blake
john poole wrote:
howard male wrote:They’re better than Newley not sub Newley, John (but then I would say that.)

‘Let Me Sleep Beside You’, ‘Silly Boy Blue’, ‘The Gospel According to Tony Day’, ‘Karma Man’, ‘In the Heat of the Morning’ – all exquisite period pieces.

I was thinking more of the singles 'The Laughing Gnome' and 'Love You 'Till Tuesday' - the first Bowie records that I heard (along with the following song that he wrote for Oscar (aka Paul Nicholas) -
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RP7BfjrOvj8



This should have it's own thread really but I'm too thick to know how to move a quote from one thread to a new one.

THANK YOU, JOHN! For alerting me to the existence of this truly, truly dreadful bit of 60s crap. I LOVE David Bowie's pre-fame stuff - when he was trying anything and everything to, er, break into showbusiness. My dad used to have an edition of Spotlight from 1968 which listed Bowie as a juvenile character actor for hire, complete with agents telephone number and very fetching head and shoulders b&w mugshot. I wish I still had it.

If I may agree with you completely, Howard, the songs you mention are my favourite Bowie songs. Just add the original take of "The Prettiest Star" (with Bolan's best ever recorded lead guitar).

Andy, listen to this wonderful abomination. Every camp Carry On cliche about poofs in prison present and correct. Ha ha! Why wasn't it a hit?

Re: John Legend & The Roots : Wake Up

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 12:05 pm
by NormanD
Adam Blake wrote:Why wasn't it a hit?

A reader of "Notes & Queries" replies:

Probably because the BBC wouldn't play it. I don't remember if it were 'banned', as such, but it did get a lot of play on the pirates. It was released around the time of a number of high-profile prison break-outs - including the great Blake (no relation) escape of 1966 - so was probably seen as a piss-take. The chorus was, of course, a cash-in on the common expression "all coppers are bastards", and may have become a terrace chant.

Camp clichés? About as many as "Round The Horne", standard for the time.

Re: John Legend & The Roots : Wake Up

PostPosted: Sat Nov 20, 2010 8:27 pm
by john poole
NormanD wrote:
Adam Blake wrote:Why wasn't it a hit?

A reader of "Notes & Queries" replies:

Probably because the BBC wouldn't play it. I don't remember if it were 'banned', as such, but it did get a lot of play on the pirates. It was released around the time of a number of high-profile prison break-outs - including the great Blake (no relation) escape of 1966 - so was probably seen as a piss-take

I think there was a press campaign against the then Home Secretary at the time and not only high-profile breakouts, but also a few prisoners going missing from an open prison for a couple of days, would be front page news.