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PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:24 pm
by Rob Hall
How could I forget? The Yakomo All Stars (in which Walter Payton also plays bass). They were a pet project of Joe Boyd's and he played a track in his ping-pong session when he appeared on Charlie's show. I liked it so much I went out and bought the album, which never really got the exposure it deserved. They recorded just the one album as far as I know, but it's well worth it if you can get hold of a copy. (It also features one of the all-time greatest funky drummers, Herlin Riley.)

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 3:34 pm
by Con Murphy
tulsehill charlie wrote:The praise meted (metered) out by forum members for the PHJB drummer got me interested - and jealous since I gave up the opportunity to go to the concert for a band practice. Since nobody mentioned a name, here's who I think he must be - Shannon Powell. Is this right?


That's the badger. Nice one, TC.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 5:55 pm
by garth cartwright
Shannon Powell is correct. Must admit i'd never come across him before but will certainly look out for him.

I once caught a NO brass band at the Union Chapel in the early 90s - they were young, very hip-hop in groove and extremely funky. Can't recall who they were tho! On the great Arhoolie 40th Anniversary Box Set there's good tracks by ReBirth Brass Band (Here To Stay) and The Treme Brass Band (Food Stamp Blues).

In Nick Tosches' Triksta he reports on how the brass bands still exist in the projects and play the bounce (NO gangsta rap) hits at street parties.

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:03 pm
by davidt
Here's a short clip of Shannon Powell back in April finishing up his drum solo. Not the best recorded evidence perhaps but you'll get the idea.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TA0rc5wOSyo

PostPosted: Wed Jun 06, 2007 7:42 pm
by Rob Hall
garth cartwright wrote:In Nick Tosches' Triksta he reports on how the brass bands still exist in the projects and play the bounce (NO gangsta rap) hits at street parties.


At the risk of coming across as a smart-arse, I feel obliged to remind Garth that it was Nik Cohn, not Nick Tosches, who wrote "Triksta".

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 12:41 pm
by garth cartwright
Rob is right and i stand embarassed by my sloppyness! Doh!!!

PostPosted: Thu Jun 07, 2007 5:27 pm
by Charlie
normand wrote:Why is "Brickyard Blues" sometimes sung as "Junkyard Blues"?

Don't know, but the two best versions of Brickyard Blues are by Little Feat (previously unissued, until released on a box set about 10 years ago) and Levon Helm, for ABC in the early 70s.

normand wrote: I sometimes wonder how singers from over here got together with big time US producers, as on this album. Elkie Brooks with Leiber & Stoller is another good example. Probably a combination of singers' good tastes and the record label being prepared to put up the money.

In the case of Leiber & Stoller, they had a contract with A&M at the time, which led to their involvement in the Stealer's Wheel album that spawned Stuck in the Middle. Leiber & Stoller were close to being thought of as over the hill, so were glad to be able to work with artists who would have been seen as cutting edge, if that phrase had existed at the time.

Allen Toussaint was a different story, being hired as one-off producer who supplied all the songs for for Frankie Miller on his album for Chrysalis and for Robert Palmer on the Sneaking Sally album for Island (which incidentally featured Lowell George of Little Feat as slide guitarist on some tracks).

But although we revere him here in this forum, Allen was still pretty much unknown in the industry, and not even his success as producer of Labelle's Lady Marmalade changed his status. If he had moved to New York, he might have cashed in. But he was a New Orleans man through and through, and not many top level artists wanted to spend a couple of months working in tropical heat.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 12:50 pm
by Des
I saw Allen Toussaint last night in Bristol and he rather outstayed his welcome, with endless monologues interspersed by great piano playing but instantly forgettable songs. The Preservation Hall Band were by contrast a splendid outfit and their spirited rendition of 'Saints' while heading a procession of concert-goers was a brilliant finale.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:43 pm
by Gordon Moore
I haven't seen him live, but I did see the tv program some months ago. I have to agree with Des, I find him "difficult" to appreciate. no doubt an amazing pianist, Tipitina is a pleasant enough piece, but generally his music is just not my cup of tea at all. he is a gentleman though, no mistake. And if this shows my lack of musical insight and appreciation, fair enough, now where's that Gentle Giant LP?


Edit, I've corrected the name, Norm wake up, wake up, Norm, Norm, slap slap, Oh, sorry, no, don't do that, Norm, let go you're hurting me, ouch.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 1:47 pm
by Rob Hall
Des wrote:I saw Allen Toussaint last night in Bristol and he rather outstayed his welcome, with endless monologues interspersed by great piano playing but instantly forgettable songs. The Preservation Hall Band were by contrast a splendid outfit and their spirited rendition of 'Saints' while heading a procession of concert-goers was a brilliant finale.


Wow Des, that's a bit harsh. On the night we saw him, there was one monologue that went on too long, and the "happy birthday" encore (did he do that in Bristol?) was a bit cheesy, but I'm of the school of thought that finds it easy to overlook such things as minor compared to his massive achievements as a songwriter, performer and producer. But "instantly forgettable songs"? "Working In A Coalmine"? "A Certain Girl"? "Yes We Can"? I think we'll have to agree to disagree on this one.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 2:13 pm
by NormanD
Gordon Moore wrote:...no doubt an amazing pianist, Tripitaca (or whatever its called, I'll correct it later)...
Gasp! Pass me the smelling salts!! Correct it now, please: Tipitina, the song originally recorded by Professor Longhair.

We had a cat that we called Tipitina (that's how I remember) 'cos she had a white tip at the end of her tail.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 7:26 pm
by davidt
I didn't realize he wasn't considered a big name in the industry.

Arranging the horns for The Band's Rock of Ages new year show, and producing In the Right Place and Desitively Bonnaroo for Dr John did it for me. He plays on these Dr John albums too, so how you're supposed to tell where he plays and where Mac plays I don't know.

When I arrived at the Barbican I was actually quite shocked he played the first set and wasn't headlining. Thankfully despite the best efforts of LT to delay my journey I'd got there on time or I'd have been mad.

PostPosted: Fri Jun 08, 2007 9:03 pm
by NormanD
There's been comments elsewhere about the correct way of pronouncing Allen's surname. He was introduced by the MC as "Tou Saint", and in the same way by the band member who invited him back up to join them. I didn't hear a "Tou Son" (sorry, I can't show it phonetically), though I gather that's the preferred pronunciation.

Though when he was talking about his mother's family name, Neville, he pronounced it "Ne Ville" rather than "Nevil".




I bet that's bored you half to death, those still reading.



Any news, maybe from our Scottish friends, on the health of Frankie Miller?