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Worst ever drum solos

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 10:45 am
by Des
...go on then.....

Chicago - I'm a Man. Interminable.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:07 am
by Gordon Neill
I dunno. They're all terrible. It's like asking 'what's the wettest bit of water?'

Re: Worst ever drum solos

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:09 am
by Papa M
Des Bowring wrote:...go on then.....

Chicago - I'm a Man. Interminable.


As a drummer I admit to generally hating drum solos. I seem to remember "I'm a Man" wasn't too bad. Isn't it just an extended funky Latin percussion lick.

I'm sure we can find plenty that are worse. Probably in the Heavy Metal category where most drummers seem to solo in a tempo that bears no relevance to the theme of the song.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:23 am
by Ian A.
Gordon Neill wrote:I dunno. They're all terrible. It's like asking 'what's the wettest bit of water?'

Star! Can I steal that?

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:28 am
by Con Murphy
Gordon Neill wrote:I dunno. They're all terrible. It's like asking 'what's the wettest bit of water?'


...although a two-minute drum solo is twice as bad as a one-minute one, and a four-minute is twice as bad as a two-minute, etc etc...

So, the question is: what's the longest ever drum solo? Therein lies the answer to Des's question.

Old Nick

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:32 am
by Gordon Neill
Ian asked:

Star! Can I steal that?


Go on then. I suspect that I've nicked it from somewhere, but I can't think where. I was hoping to enter it into the Charlie Gillett 'phrase of the month' competition.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:36 am
by Gordon Neill
Con argued:

...although a two-minute drum solo is twice as bad as a one-minute one, and a four-minute is twice as bad as a two-minute, etc etc...


Yes, in theory. But, let's be honest, after the first 30 seconds or so, you lose all consciousness of time and simply drift off to another place. So a drum solo might as well last 3 hours as 3 minutes. And is it actually possible to time them? You'd never stay awake to press the stop-watch.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:37 am
by Papa M
Con Murphy wrote:...although a two-minute drum solo is twice as bad as a one-minute one, and a four-minute is twice as bad as a two-minute, etc etc...


Having initially learnt the drums from watching jazz drummers I am still partial to watching solos by the likes of Gene Krupa, Buddy Rich, Louis Bellson etc.
Jazz drummers seem to make soloing far more entertaining than Rock drummers.

Longest live solo I've seen was probably Ginger Baker with Cream who extended his "Toad" solo to 20+ minutes. However his technical ability made his solos always quite tolerable.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 11:59 am
by Nigel w
There's a John Bonham drum solo on Moby Dick on Led Zeppelin : The DVD that is more than 15 minutes long. On occassion, it allegedly ran to half an hour. The rest of the band left the stage and how long he played for depended on when they decided to return...

Great drummer, certainly my favourite rock drummer - quite a few famous Led Zeppelin songs had their birth in his drum patterns , including Rock'n'Roll on Led Zep IV. His playing on tracks like When The Levee Breaks and Kashmir has surely never been bettered.

His best solo, though, can be heard on a track called Bonzo's Montreux, recorded in 1976 at the Montreux jazz festival and included several years later on the posthumous Zep album Coda. It's really quite world music-influenced. Parts of it are not dissimilar to Mickey Hart's ethno-percussion experiments : there's a definite African vibe and even something of Konono No 1 in the distorted rhythms. I suspect many forumistas would be very pleasantly surprised by it...

I know the post heading is worst drum solos. But you know me - always like to be positive...

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 12:41 pm
by Hugh Weldon
Easy.

Carl Palmer with ELP Liverpool Empire 1974 (?).

Interminable, what was I doing there?

Also a whole gig by Stomu Yamashta (was that worldmusik?).

Though I agree with Papa, jazz drum solos can be worth listening to. The older stuff, not the Billy Cobhams etc.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 12:54 pm
by Adam Blake
nigel w wrote: quite a few famous Led Zeppelin songs had their birth in his drum patterns , including Rock'n'Roll on Led Zep IV.


Hem-hem... stolen wholesale from the intro to Little Richard's "Keep A Knockin'"

Love Bonzo though. I once asked a drummer friend how he got that sound. He just laughed and said he just hit the drums harder than anybody else!

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 1:12 pm
by Nigel w
All this talk of John Bonham reminds me of an off-colour joke the mighty sticksman is once alleged to have made.

"How long's your drum solo, Bonzo?''

"Depends how long it takes the rest of the band to get a blow-job backstage."

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 1:22 pm
by Papa M
Having said I hate drum solos I'm now going to contradict myself.

If you look at drum technique and tutorial DVDs there is some really incredible and inspiring drum solo work. For example DVDs by Greg Bissonette, Thomas Lang, John Blackwell, Steve Smith and my favourite - Big Time by Billy Ward.

However during each of these DVDs there will be a segment where the drummer in question plays with a band, either his regular gig or an improv. Usually these musical segments are dire - bland jazz-funk. And yet the drummer on his own is magnificent.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 1:45 pm
by Ted
Con Murphy wrote:...although a two-minute drum solo is twice as bad as a one-minute one, and a four-minute is twice as bad as a two-minute, etc etc...


I think you'll find its a square law - a 2 minute drum solo is actually 4 times as bad as a 1 minute solo - a 16 minute one is 256 times as bad.

PostPosted: Thu Jul 24, 2008 2:37 pm
by Con Murphy
Ted wrote:
Con Murphy wrote:...although a two-minute drum solo is twice as bad as a one-minute one, and a four-minute is twice as bad as a two-minute, etc etc...


I think you'll find its a square law


I thought for a moment that you were going to accuse me of not being hip-to-the-trip, daddio, for not appreciating all those great jazz drummers. To which I’d have to plead guilty as charged, although I’m not averse to the odd short cameo solo run as part of a free ‘n’ flowing jazz or rhythm and blues number, or indeed the occasional West African percussive wig-out.