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Re: Listening Spot Check

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:28 pm
by Jonathan E.
Ian Anderson's fRoots Radio from October. The last minutes of it. Missed a few episodes, my subscription lapsed, and had to go through digital contortions to catch up. Worth it.

Re: Listening Spot Check

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 10:42 pm
by Jonathan E.
fRoots Radio from November — up to the Kary Carr track, loving it.

Re: Listening Spot Check

PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2012 11:05 pm
by Jonathan E.
Wow! and a great track from a fab sounding new Analog African compilation, Diablos Del Ritmo - The Colombian Melting Pot 1960-1985 ! Very groovy. Lust is arising.

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Re: Listening Spot Check

PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2012 3:06 am
by Jonathan E.
The rather weirdly titled Icon Give Thank by a strange meeting of electronic musicians Sun Araw & M.Gedes Gengras with The Congos — not quite reggae, definitely not what I'd really call dub although a lot of sound processing, but all rather nice in the way it came together.

Now moving on to The Soothsayers' new one, Human Nature. I got very entranced by their horn section's dub collaboration as Red Earth Collective with Manasseh on the board, Red Earth Dub. This is sounding good.

Re: Listening Spot Check

PostPosted: Fri May 24, 2013 6:59 am
by kas
Since yesterday I have been under the spell of the Mughal-E-Azam film soundtrack album. I have the audio restored version that Saregama put out some years ago, to go along with the computer colourised, restored release of the film. The album sounds every bit as gorgerous as its cover art looks:

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The soundtrack was composed by Naushad Ali, the top film music maker of the day, who was especially famed for his use of classical music. Mughal-E-Azam was a no-holds-barred megaproduction with a literally fabulous budget. To ensure he would get the best music available, director K. Asif went to Naushad with a briefcase full of money. Naushad was offended and threw the money out of the window. Naushad's wife talked the men some sense and the film got its classic soundtrack in the end.

Lata Mangeshkar, Samshad Begum Mohammed Rafi were enlisted as singers, and both Naushad and Asif also approached the already legendary master Ustad Bade Ghulam Ali Khan. Khan rejected the offer, saying he disliked film work. Asif asked Ghulam Ali to name his fee. Ghulam Ali quoted a fee of 25 000 rupees per song (Lata was being paid 300 - 400 rupees per song). To his astonishment K. Asif agreed right away.

I also read that the release of the soundtrack album was an equally no-holds-barred project. All the vocals were retained but remastered, while original composer Naushad and arranger Uttam Singh rerecorded the orchestral parts with live musicians.

Fab, huh? The album is in any case, and the film is also a pretty mind boggling experience.