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Meet the new blues

PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2015 11:42 pm
by Rob Hall
Saw this and thought of Adam (or, rather, his blood pressure):

http://www.theguardian.com/music/2015/j ... -new-blues

There probably is an article to be written about young musicians and the blues, but this isn't it.

(Edited to correct the link.)

Re: Meet the new blues

PostPosted: Thu Jan 01, 2015 11:47 pm
by Adam Blake
Thanks for your concern, Rob, but the link leads to a Meters tune (which I have played in public in company with Ted Wood and Andrew Ranken.)

Re: Meet the new blues

PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 12:18 am
by Rob Hall
Oops! Sorry about that. Now fixed.

Re: Meet the new blues

PostPosted: Fri Jan 02, 2015 12:28 am
by Adam Blake
Ah, OK. Got it. I like Geoff Travis. He's a real music lover, and he knows his blues. I used to teach his son. As for this new lot, well, I say good luck to them. I daresay the blues will remain as untouched by their revisionism as it was by Led Zeppelin's in the late 60s. They might make some money off it, and if they have anything of their own to say, I am sure it will emerge in due course. I really don't mean to sound snotty. The conditions that created the music in the first place: the slave trade, institutionalised racism, rape, murder etc are not going to be repeated - at least not quite in the same way to the same people. The music was a sublimely beautiful thing borne from hideous ugliness. The stakes just aren't that high anymore. Thankfully.

Re: Meet the new blues

PostPosted: Sat Jan 03, 2015 3:05 pm
by Garth Cartwright
I interviewed Benjamin Booker in New Orleans in June. Nice kid, writes a decent tear up rocker. He would never call himself a blues artist. He likes blues cos he is a Gun Club and Nirvana fan so has checked out some old stuff. This is a very poorly written feature that seems to think blues is something on major labels played by rock stars - why isn't Joe Bonamassa mentioned? And her contention that there is no blues any more in the US... a sub to Living Blues would teach her a lot. Blues is marginal now but it has been so ever since black Americans took more to R&B in the 1950s. And when it is played by good players anywhere in the world - Adam & Errol, Big Joe & Little George, Ian Siegal (I've seen all the aforementioned in concert in recent months and all were great) - then it lives. But the Guardian does not go to such artists as they are not on big labels and hyped by the likes of Pitchfork.