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Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 6:24 pm
by Jamie Renton
Combining jokiness, grumpiness and pub rock...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KgcAxjbiyY

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 6:40 pm
by AndyM
One of my all-time favourite records, but soooooooooooooooooo not pub rock.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Thu Oct 30, 2014 8:01 pm
by will vine
I managed to miss Lee Kosmin every time he was on at The Torrington, but this was a CG favorite that I hoped might turn up on his Honky Tonk -Radio Picks vol.2. (but didn't).

http://youtu.be/ku8yQ6xNLPU

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 1:03 am
by john poole
uiwangmike wrote:In 1967 (I think it was) I bought for 2 shillings (or was it 1 and 6?) a worn-out jukebox copy of I Love my Dog by Cat Stevens in a cafe in Porthmadog. I was partial to the B-side, Portobello Road. I may still have it somewhere.
Even better is a version by Ellen Janov (daughter of Arthur Janov, the "Primal Scream" mentor to John & Yoko in 1970)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mErxz_iNSkQ
http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0417899/bio
(not pub rock)

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 5:04 pm
by Hugh Weldon
My pub rock favourites are not very well represented on youtube, but here's a few I liked going to see:

Balham Alligators

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Om-R4lQDqw

Ron Kavana

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ye1Go-Mm_-k

Brendan Croker

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o-0eWcJArKM

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 5:38 pm
by Adam Blake
Nice one, Hugh. Funnily enough, my old writing mentor Dave Laing gave me both the Ron Kavana and Brendan Croker albums to review for Music Week back in the day. I also interviewed Ron Kavana. What a lovely bloke. With hindsight, it's obvious that Laing had a rather subversive agenda: putting such proletarian music in amongst the padded shoulders and powdered noses of the late 80s music business establishment. I hope they got a decent distribution deal or two off the back of my reviews (who knows?)

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 5:53 pm
by Jamie Renton
AndyM wrote:One of my all-time favourite records, but soooooooooooooooooo not pub rock.


Lawks a lawdy, next you'll be saying this feller isn't pub rock: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0aAGP3ty_A

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 6:03 pm
by AndyM
He had to start somewhere, but soon transcended such lumpen beginnings.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:15 pm
by Rob Hall
I well remember making a trek up to - I think it was The Nashville - to catch this young Elvis Costello chappie before he got too popular on the back of his single 'Watching The Detectives'. When we got there, the queues went for about a quarter of a mile around the block.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 7:43 pm
by will vine
Did we mention this little combo yet?

http://youtu.be/JDjtJ3yZ8b8

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:11 pm
by Chris P
in the 80s I saw an amateur heavy metal band in a pub in Hull. 'Rough' (haha) men in too-tight fancy clothing with big-but-greasy hair, make-up & 5 o'clock shadow. To be fair they really rocked, with plenty of edges, original material, dedication to a bacchanalial rock spirit, and some in-the-moment inventive playing, with none of the 2nd hand posing or pomp that were prevalent in the famous 80s metal bands. For the genre they were the real deal. In many ways they sum up what pub-rock means or meant to me on a UK-wide notion. Sure London (and Liverpool & Birmingham?) has always had quality roots-soaked rockers who could write original material as well as being true fanboys & masters of knowing the gems and obscurities to cover. But for a while (I'm sure it's not true now), the best chance of a good pub gig in parts of England were the metal groups who'd also absorbed the Mick Ronson guitar approach. They contrasted with some really tired & poor quality pub musicians who specialised in woeful cover versions of rock-pop hits by such as Dire Straits (also once pub-rock) & such as Clapton. Nowadays there seems to be any amount of blues-rock, or slightly weird but maybe limpish singer-songwriters on offer in just about any pub music environment.
There are also pubs who, due to music loving landladies and landlords, specialise in offering better music in a better environment than out-&-out music venues. Much of the most enjoyable & high quality live music I've seen in the last 3 years has been at the Prince Albert in Stroud. Many of the same names that get talked about here at Charlie's forum, fitting in this small venue because they enjoy playing it.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:58 pm
by Adam Blake
Jamie Renton wrote:Lawks a lawdy, next you'll be saying this feller isn't pub rock: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N0aAGP3ty_A


Lovely to hear that one again, Jamie. Very nostalgic.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 11:07 am
by Jamie Renton
Danny Baker's got Paul Carrick on his programme right now (and presumably on the i-player for another week.

Brown sauce I'd say, definitely brown sauce.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 12:23 pm
by will vine
I have just bought my copy of Charlie's/Roger Armstrong's Honky Tonk Radio Picks Vol.2 (really out of a sense of loyalty). At the same time here I find a discussion of Pub Rock which sort of has it's roots in mid seventies London, and on another current thread is a discussion of G.T. Moore whose name cropped up regularly on Honky Tonk in John Collis's gigs round-up slot on the show. It was a lovely little poetic litany, the equal to me of the shipping forecast on Radio Four.

[i]........also tonight, Hank Wangford at The Half Moon in Putney, and The Kursaal Flyers at The Torrington. On Monday at The Lord Nelson in Holloway, Ducks Deluxe. Juice on the Loose are at The Hope, and Rocky Sharpe and The Razors are at Dingwalls. On to Tuesday and a double bill of G.T. Moore and The Reggae Guitars and Max Merritt and The Meteors at The Nashville in Kensington. Dr. Hook at The Rainbow, Matchbox at The Telegraph on Brixton Hill, Charlie and The Wideboys, eight o'clock at The Pegasus, Red Beans and Rice.....

Mysterious names and romantic sounding places, what radio is all about, and bands, often semi-pro, that dug out and played a lot of stuff we might never have heard just as Charlie was doing with his Sunday lunchtime show. The show acted as a clubhouse and noticeboard for these bands and musicians.

I owe my wasted middle age to Honky Tonk and to Pub Rock.

Re: The Decent Pub Rock Thread

PostPosted: Sat Nov 01, 2014 1:09 pm
by Adam Blake
will vine wrote:
I owe my wasted middle age to Honky Tonk and to Pub Rock.


Hah! I wasted my youth on it, and therefore get very protective.