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Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 12:31 pm
by AndyM
DavidM wrote:
Can you really do a PhD on Chuck Berry ? Is that necessary ?

(The PhD, I mean, surely a BA would be sufficient - ?)

Professor Andy... Help me somebody !


You can do a PhD on virtually anything if you make a strong enough case for it, can find plausibly academic angles on it and can persuade a university to take you on. I supervised one on Viv Stanshall, for example, but it wasn't just a celebratory account of him, it placed him and his work in the assorted contexts of the art school influence on British pop and the role of the 'eccentric' as a recurring figure in British culture.

I'd have thought there were several PhDs-worth in Chuck Berry.

Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 1:19 pm
by Chris P
There's been, and I think still is, a lot of Viv on the radio at the moment. Really inspired stuff. Check the 4Extra listings for UK radio

Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 5:37 pm
by Pete Fowler
But at the time it disturbed me deeply. You were the first to shake my faith in Marc.


Trouble is, Adam, I was wrong! Because that essay has been re-printed a few times, I've found it acutely embarrassing over the years that some of it was so patently bollocks. On the other hand, it was good for its time in that it dared to suggest links between class and rock, and it may have been the first piece to do this, I'm not sure, Jon Savage and Barney whats his name certainly thought so; but, typical of a then-25 year old Trot, it took its thesis to a point where it collapsed within its own contradictions and went right off the rails. Fun, though: I remember I did it in one evening. I'd spent weeks doing those bloody Rock File charts, spending day after day at the NME, no computers or anything like that, and then, not long before publication, Charlie rang and said they were an article short....any thoughts?....

Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 6:33 pm
by Adam Blake
I re-read it again not long ago when I put two and two together and realised I was in correspondence with its author! I think it's a very good piece, Pete, and absolutely no need to be embarrassed about it. It was very brave for its time too, and, as you say, quite innovatory. I don't think veracity is all that important to good music writing. Lester Bangs and Nik Cohn never worried about it. Why should you?!

Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Thu Aug 14, 2014 7:17 pm
by AndyM
Pete Fowler wrote: it dared to suggest links between class and rock, and it may have been the first piece to do this



I think it was, Pete, certainly in a publication accessible to a general audience.

Re: Reddington's Rare Records

PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2014 12:19 am
by john poole