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Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 10:37 pm
by AndyM
Donny & Marie Osmond do Steely Dan.

With an ice skating interlude.

Don't say you weren't warned (but you can skip the last couple of minutes as they go into a '''''comedy''''' section).

http://laughingsquid.com/donny-and-mari ... w-in-1978/

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Fri Jun 20, 2014 11:26 pm
by Adam Blake
Thanks, Andy. I needed to see that.

Is it just me or does anyone else think about the rehearsals, the blocking, the choreography, the costumes? I mean, highly skilled professional people worked hard and long to put that together. I particularly enjoy the way they go back , briefly, into the number at the end, after that staggeringly unfunny sketch.

Do you remember when The Andy Williams Show was broadcast every week - it would have been '69-'70 - and The Osmonds were his regular guests? I hated Donny then. He got right up my nose. When he became a massive teen idol in '72 it was definitely a case of "I told you he was a creep".

David Cassidy was so much cooler, as indeed were The Partridge Family.

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 12:00 am
by Adam Blake
Here you are, Andy. Present for you. Stick it out until about a minute in, then it goes all psychedelic and they do really horrible things to Donovan's "Sunshine Superman".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T_s9lAgs ... JND11QZb0t

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 12:04 am
by john poole

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:15 am
by AndyM
John, I think that clip proves that Marie was the only redeemable Osmond.

Adam, I used to watch & enjoy the Andy Williams show, but my memories of it seem to have excised the Osmonds entirely. The human brain can be a kind thing. (My main memory is of the stupid sketches involving a man dressed as a bear.)

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:33 pm
by Hugh Weldon
Isn't odd looking back that they were seriously touted as competition to the Jackson 5? Wasn't 'One Bad Apple' a sort of J5 imitation? (I couldn't really be bothered listening again to check)

'Crazy Horses' made an impact on 'Top of The Pops' but when the Jacksons did 'Looking Through The Windows' a couple of weeks later, the tasteful amongst us knew where we stood.

Andy

(My main memory is of the stupid sketches involving a man dressed as a bear.)


Stupid? Maybe, but that bear was the star of the show for me.

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 4:38 pm
by AndyM
I liked the bear a lot too! But I have a feeling it wouldn't look like comedy gold if re-watched today.

'One Bad Apple' was actually pretty accomplished as shameless impersonations go.

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 5:16 pm
by Adam Blake
"No cookies. Not now. Not ever." I thought that was the most awfully heartless thing to say to a bear and I never liked Andy Williams after that.

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 5:43 pm
by will vine
I so wanted to post Chalie Dore's Mr. Williams at this point but it's not available on youtube. It is worth copping a snippet of it on Itunes though....Or Spotify.
Clever and lyrical song about Andy.

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 7:01 pm
by john poole
Hugh Weldon wrote:Isn't odd looking back that they were seriously touted as competition to the Jackson 5? Wasn't 'One Bad Apple' a sort of J5 imitation?
Written by the great Southern Soul songwriter George Jackson, aimed for the Jackson Five, but recorded by the Osmonds at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals - reached #6 on the r&b chart; George's first million selling song.

The composer can be seen playing a short extract and talking briefly about the song here (not in hi-fidelity)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CYR2XnCxbyw

Re: Most Disturbing Cover Version Ever ??

PostPosted: Sat Jun 21, 2014 8:41 pm
by Hugh Weldon
John:

Written by the great Southern Soul songwriter George Jackson, aimed for the Jackson Five, but recorded by the Osmonds at Fame Studios in Muscle Shoals - reached #6 on the r&b chart; George's first million selling song.


Thanks as ever for coming up with some interesting background John, I'd imagined 'One Bad Apple' being written by a tin pan alley hack with a stack of Motown singles, a piano and the metaphorical equivalent of a gun to his head. I suppose I'll have to listen again now.