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The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 2:07 pm
by Rob Hall
Of all the acts we've discussed here, I can't recall us ever jive talkin' (see what I did there?) about the brothers Gibb. There's a pretty sympathetic interview with Barry, the last Gibb standing, in today's Guardian:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2013/ju ... usic-alive

For my own part, while I recall liking 'New York Mining Disaster', 'Words', 'Gotta Get A Message To You', etc., when I was a young teen, the charms of their later disco-era fame were lost on me.

There's a few interesting points made in the Guardian piece in respect of their lack of credibility, and I think there's a case to be made: if we can love Abba, surely we can love the Bee Gees? I haven't counted but I would imagine that, in terms of numbers alone, they wrote as many hits as Bjorn & Benny? Maybe they took themselves a little too seriously? The time they went walkabout while Clive Anderson was interviewing them might suggest so.

On the other hand it may be that, as Barry claims to be in the interview, we're just past caring?

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 6:28 pm
by AndyM
I think there have been Bee Gee conversations here. I was more prepared to defend them than most, though not uncritically.

There were a few exchanges when Robin Gibb died last year.

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 7:50 pm
by will vine
I don't think they need defending. They brought what they had to the party, used it all creatively and deserved their success. If they'd done no more than written To Love Somebody they'd be o.k. with me.............(feeling kinda mellow tonight, maybe the sun eh?).

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 10:30 pm
by gary booth
Rob, I too would mention them in the same breath/discussion as Abba as artists whose hit records are still with us today and are seen as something, and somehow, beyond manufactured. I love Pop records that are manufactured but there's this yawning gap between those that are novelty, disposable, wondrous in their moment, magic, or mood, etc and those made by The Bee Gees or Abba. Why the world loves them is not beyond me - I blame Elvis Costello (even before he stopped making decent records) he thought it would be fashionably unhip to laud both groups. But, I happen to think that if someone said to The Bee Gees and Abba " You can make worldwide hit records which will sell for ever and ever but we have to remove that gene, that bit of your heart or soul, that loves music they would have signed up immediately.

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Fri Jul 19, 2013 11:16 pm
by Rob Hall
AndyM wrote:I think there have been Bee Gee conversations here. I was more prepared to defend them than most, though not uncritically.

There were a few exchanges when Robin Gibb died last year.

You are right Andy. And I see now that I am perilously close to contradicting the position I took on them a year ago. But that, I think, is what prompted me to make my initial post: the interview with Barry caused me to re-assess my view of them.

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 12:21 am
by Adam Blake
The Bee Gees have probably made more great records that I can't stand than any other act in the history of Pop.






(The sound of their voices, in particular that trademark falsetto vibrato, sets my teeth on edge. If pushed, I like the disco era stuff better than the 60s stuff. I like the guitar at the start of "Stayin' Alive" better than anything else on any of their other records.)

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 10:22 am
by Jamie Renton

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Sat Jul 20, 2013 4:40 pm
by Adam Blake
Thank you, Jamie!

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 2:20 pm
by alister prince
Maybe the difference between the BeeGees and Abba is that cover versions of the BeeGees songs were often better than the original. I've never been even a closet Abba fan (simply, their stuff doesn't interest me), but they do it best. The first time I heard Nina Simone do 'To Love Somebody', I thought it excellent, then I saw who wrote it. After pinching myself I realised it was all about her interpretation, I disliked theirs, as I do for all their stuff.
What is it about groups whose name is based on initials?
Aly

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 3:03 pm
by NormanD
Hi Aly! And welcome
What is it about groups whose name is based on initials?

Wot about The JBs?

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 5:53 pm
by Willy
Hello and welcome Aly :)
I remember buying an Abba single among all the other mostly "serious" music I was buying and having no shame about it.
I just couldn't identify with them (as if I needed to) so I never listened to their LP's.
Same goes for the BeeGees but looking back I had some of the best times when they happened to be on at a party or disco, so make of that what you will.

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 6:37 pm
by John Y
Can't believe no one's mentioned the peerless Al Green cover of How Can You Mend A Broken Heart. Especially when the original was so utterly wet and a weed.

Having said that, I do think they knew how to construct a song as well as anyone. Well, okay, as well as most. And I love the Jive Talking bassline.

But how was the O'Jays' name derived?

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 7:58 pm
by Adam Blake
John Y wrote:But how was the O'Jays' name derived?


Hello and welcome, John Y.

Possibly overfond of orange juice??

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 9:18 pm
by gary booth
O'Jays named after Cleveland D.J. Eddie O'Jay. Yes, I looked it up.

Re: The Bee Gees

PostPosted: Tue Jul 30, 2013 10:14 pm
by NormanD
Idea: a klezmer soul band called The Oy Veys. Along with the klez trad folk group The Lubliners, and the klez heavy metal band Schvatze Shabbos.

No, I don't know either what it's got to do with the BGs.