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Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Mon Dec 13, 2010 3:59 am
by judith
Chris P wrote:Annabouboula, New York Greek stewful mixers-up, as feted in current fRoots. This is from the 90's - great punchy stuff with some nice electric slide and clarinet. From a BBC docu that I wish I'd seen, 7 minutes of which follows with interview, background & more performance - intriguing:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6vX2_qYQhiU

great rebetika lyrics :
"And no matter how much stuff you smoke,
Well, bum, you can't tumble me"


Hey! that looks just like the green bottle neck Adam got at the recycling center when he was here! Love the lyrics. Hopefully the documentary will come around again.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 9:49 am
by Chris P
ÖZLEM ÖZDIL gives the baglama some seeing to here, her singing's got some 'tude too :

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AnFBeVJA4QE

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 4:38 pm
by AndyM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JnA-PuuB ... 4&index=21


This is at the poppy end of Turkish music, I know, but I love it.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Thu Jan 20, 2011 6:03 pm
by Philellinas
I don't think it would register on the hardcoreethnicometer, Andy, but it seemed to go down well with the crowd.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Tue Feb 01, 2011 8:56 pm
by Chris P

Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Tue Feb 08, 2011 11:01 am
by Philellinas
Image
Yet more music of the Greek diaspora. In this case we have Karamanlidika, songs from Cappadocia. The Karamanlides are/were Greek Orthodox, spoke Turkish but wrote the language in Greek script. I imagine the late president of Greece, Konstantinos Karamanlis, had some ancestral connection. I have seen gravestones in Istanbul with inscriptions in Karamanlidika. Even by my standards this is an obscure furrow to plough but most of our ancestors started out as agricultural labourers. Here's the relevant Wiki entry http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karamanlides

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:28 am
by judith
Yikes. Started out on your link on towards Byzantium, then due to some link in the Byzantine article, read a bit about the Franks. Yes, obscure stuff but very fascinating. For example, that literacy was important to these people - and the Byzantines even though the majority 'lived in rural agrarian areas' (Wikipedia).

I was able to listen to some songs from Cappadocia from an album called "Guardians of Hellenism - Pontos, Cappadocia". I really liked the track/singer "Stou Gianakki Mou to Gammo (At My Johnny's Wedding" by Ileana Kapsadami and that by Tasos Aloupis. The tracks I listened to from Pontos sounded to me as having, more of a Central Asian influence, the instruments that is - in a much busier and less languid sort of way.

If nothing else, I am beginning to get my geography sorted out on this thread. Hopefully some of the sounds will soon start falling into place.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Sat Feb 12, 2011 9:37 pm
by Chris P
How the name Barbaros came into the Turkish language:

Barbarossa Hayrettin Pasha (Turkish: Barbaros Hayrettin Paşa or Hızır Hayrettin Paşa (c. 1478 – 4 July 1546) was an Ottoman admiral who dominated the Mediterranean for decades. He was born on the island of Lesbos/ Mytilini and died in Istanbul, the Ottoman capital.

His original name was Yakupoğlu Hızır, he became known as Barbarossa (Redbeard in Italian) in Europe, a name he inherited from his older brother Baba Oruç (Father Aruj) after Oruç was killed in a battle with the Spanish in Algeria. This name sounded like "Barbarossa" (Redbeard) to the Europeans, and Oruç did have a red beard. The nickname stuck then also to Hayrettin's Turkish name, in the form Barbaros.
:

and here are a tantalizing 32 seconds of the most famous musician of that name - Barbaros Erkose:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HP0cbDc8gD0

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread & Kurdish!

PostPosted: Thu Feb 17, 2011 2:35 pm
by kastamonu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4IxOyt9sCbc&feature=fvw

Hozan Beşir - lovely song and saz playing - sung in Kurdish

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Sun Feb 20, 2011 11:21 pm
by Ian A.
Just been playing the new Imam Baildi CD The Imam Baildi Cookbook (Capitol Greece/ Kukin)which finally showed up last week. It's brilliant - big leap forward from their excellent first.

Just checked and can see that the splendid and very reliable Xylouris shop in Athens have it: http://xilouris.gr/catalog/index.php?language=en and search at the top.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 10:11 am
by Chris P
When the turkish pop diva & the kurdish roots diva hooked-up:

Acoustic & tasteful (still good in parts) :
http://youtu.be/dmfa_YAMINs

Electric & cheesy anthem (still good in parts, more fun, & some fab singing from Aynur), follows short advert:
http://dai.ly/mGPOxz
(Pauline do you know what they're saying in the joking talky interlude?)

This'd draw some comment from Phillelinas if he wasn't atop Mount Athos now clearing paths, actual & metaphorical miles from t'interweb, mobiles etc

(warning da bald man in the clips is a hardened guitar & style criminal)

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 2:45 pm
by kastamonu
[quote="Chris P"]When the turkish pop diva & the kurdish roots diva hooked-up:

Oh gr8 Chris - many thanks - will savour at my(our leisure) here!

Firstly - agree about 'da bald guy' - ha ha! Just love Aynur D - a guy interviewed in Istanbul (when Charlie met her not too long before he died) said she has a 'God-given voice' - took me a while to get into her stuff but so agree now...

Apropos of nothing (as usual with me!) my hubby Aydın studied the first song (very old and famous Turkish folk-song) when he was learning saz (for a very short while but to be continued hopefully!) here in Foça - it was all he learnt (did well but I got a tad fed-up hearing the same song over and over).

As for the jokey exchanges in the interlude - they are speaking much too fast for my limited Turkish - I'll study that a bit again as well later & maybe get back to you! At a rough guess I might suggest Sertab is complementing Aynur on her voice & asking how she achieves it but could well be wrong.....)

Bests
P (lucky Phil at Mount Athos again!)

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 6:24 pm
by judith
Hey, Chris, thanks! I was past due for this. I think one could take a lesson on how to wear a gown from these ladies for they - in attire, accessories, and ease - make the women in the endless recent photos of Hollywood's red carpet look like little girls playing dress up and trying too hard.

I always expect harmonization when vocalists sing in unison. When Adam pointed out to me that Arabic orchestras do not harmonize (Sir, please correct me if I've gotten that wrong), I was amazed that I'd not ever noticed that before.

I loved the good parts in the 'cheesy anthem', particularly Aynur's singing of which I am very fond.

Hi, Pauline! and I, too, hope Phil is enjoying clearing some paths atop Mount Athos whichever they may be. Fascinating place.

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 7:12 pm
by kastamonu
Hi Judith - good to see/hear you again! x

Re: Greek and Turkish music thread

PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2011 7:14 pm
by AndyM
Love those two clips.