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Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:02 am
by Peter Culshaw
Interesting this talk of Charlie's lack of taste. Even in world music he had terrible blind spots - hating practically all Brazilian music, as I'm sure has been discussed here many times. DJ Dolores was about the only Brazilian he seemed to like in recent years as far as I remember. He would also be rude about records like Ibrahim Ferrer's first solo album - ok you may not rate it that highly (I do, actually) but to actively dislike it seemed truly odd to me. But what you did get the feeling was that whatever he said was going to be interesting, without fear or favour... and of course he could be fantastically generous as well.

Likewise looking forward to young Boyd's tome........

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:50 am
by Jonathan E.
Peter Culshaw wrote:Interesting this talk of Charlie's lack of taste. Even in world music he had terrible blind spots - hating practically all Brazilian music, as I'm sure has been discussed here many times. DJ Dolores was about the only Brazilian he seemed to like in recent years as far as I remember. . . .

I recall him getting a bit over-excited by some of that new Brazilian crop of wispy young things accompanied by digital or other doodling. But, as I said, it is personal taste — he had it, no doubt — and many a time I've found that eventually, following several plays, I liked, at least moderately, a tune selected by him after an initial shrug of the shoulders.

And, of course, sometimes, the first listen would just set the blood of enthusiasm rushing . . .

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 2:52 am
by Peter Culshaw
I did get him interested in Ceu, much to my surprise....

relating to Boyd - found this on his website, written about a year ago:
" It was comforting knowing Charlie was there and many of us gauged our commitment to music and the community surrounding it by keeping an eye on him. No one competed with Charlie; he didn’t take up anyone else’s space, he expanded yours as he created his own. He glowed so brightly we’re all a bit in the dark now."

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 6:31 am
by Jonathan E.
Peter Culshaw wrote:I did get him interested in Ceu, much to my surprise....

Hah! It was you!
Boyd wrote:" It was comforting knowing Charlie was there and many of us gauged our commitment to music and the community surrounding it by keeping an eye on him. No one competed with Charlie; he didn’t take up anyone else’s space, he expanded yours as he created his own. He glowed so brightly we’re all a bit in the dark now."

Words to live by! I'll do my best. The pressure is on.

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:14 am
by Martin Owen
Hmm... not sure that being suprised by Osmond Bros Crazy Horses is quite a good pop-rock record from an unsuspected source signifies bad taste. It is indicative of an openness and a love of good popular music irrespective of the track record of the performer.

In another Sunday morning recollection- in some box in some corner of my archaeology is a cassette of the Honky Tonk Best of 1979 show ( a lot of Stiff). The suprise item there is Newton-John/Travolta "The one that I want" - which was Charlie's selection as record of the year - a choice that is very easy to understand - but I think Charlie must have been smiling at what he imagined was the reaction of some of the listnerhood.

On the other hand Brazilian music is soooo varied. You can love Mangue and avoid Brega like the plague (but I am getting old).

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 10:20 am
by howard male
Peter wrote –

I did get him interested in Ceu, much to my surprise....


I’m not sure why you were surprised, Peter. As for as I worked it out, Charlie like the non-generic (even if it was Brazilian) as long as it still had a good tune. Ceu wasn’t straight bossa nova or samba, her arrangements were full of surprises, she could sing, and there were still tunes in there (OK, and she had a nice smile on her), so I would have bet money on her winning him over. For the same reasons I think he would have liked Tulipa.

I was certainly able to predict his tastes in this area on a few occasions such as with Lhasa and Nneka. But in the instances when the voice didn’t appeal (for example Netsayi and Wunmi) it didn’t matter how much I raved on about them to him, he couldn’t be shifted.

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:17 pm
by NormanD
howard male wrote:...For the same reasons I think he would have liked Tulipa.
Might have liked, never "would". Unless you are spiritualistically convinced and are convening with Madame Betty of Bayswater?

Re: Charlie's gone

PostPosted: Thu Mar 24, 2011 12:53 pm
by howard male
You really do test my patience sometimes, Norman (yes, I know – “and likewise Howard”). The uncertainty which you require from my statement is in the words “I think”. If I’d said “I know” then your point would have been valid.